Iron Leg Digital Trip #2 – The Freaked Out Mind Blowing Scene of Right Now!

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Set List.
McCoys
– Fever (Bang)
Cryan Shames – Ben Franklin’s Almanac (Destination)
Rationals – Out In the Streets (A2)
The Lime – Soul Kitchen (Westwood)
Strangeloves – Night Time (Bang)
Music Machine – Masculine Intuition (Original Sound)
British Walkers – Diddley Daddy (Try)
Guilloteens – For My Own (HBR)
Sidekicks – Not Now (RCA)
New Colony Six – Let Me Love You (Sentar)

Listen/Download Mixed Mp3 26MB

Downoad ZIP File 26MB

Greetings all.
I hope all is well by you.
This has been a weekend of extremes. Friday night was all about fun, dropping a set of funk and soul at the Asbury Park 45 Sessions. Saturday on the other hand saw me locked in mortal combat with the millions of leaves on my lawn. When the day was done, my body was wracked with pain (bad knees, is a bad thing brother) and I had twenty five of those 30LB leaf bag stacked up on the side of my house.
I have to tell you, nothing…abso-freaking-lutely NOTHING, strikes me as a more intense waste of time and energy than blowing, raking and bagging leaves, the natural by-product of….uhhh…TREES. If it wasn’t for my “neighbors” – who once left me an anonymous note in my mailbox complaining that I waited too long to pick up my LEAVES – I’d leave those beautiful red, yellow and orange bits of natural wonderfulness rolling around my lawn reflecting the sunlight.
Maybe I need to start a pro-leaf movement of some kind.
POWER TO THE LEAVES!!
F*** THE NEIGHBORS!!
Thank Jeebus I can still type, or the whole enterprise would come crashing down.
I’d been kind of dancing around the idea of a garage punk podcast for a while, circling the idea warily like a wrestler looking for an opening, and then last week a reader made a specific request thereof, and so here I sit, writing up the accompanying text for same (your wish, of course, being my command).
When I swooped down on the crates to select the 45s for this mix, I had no specific theme in mind outside of the obvious stylistic touchstones (timewise and fuzzwise), and the only guiding factor was to find ten sides that grabbed me. Among those sides were a few things that I hadn’t listened to in years and decided to give a refresher spin. A couple of those went back in the box, and a couple ended up in the mix.
Things get started with a serious fave by the McCoys. If I never hear ‘Hang On Sloopy’ again, I wouldn’t miss it, but their take on Little Wille John’s ‘Fever’ is pure garage heat. Sometime in the future I’ll have to post their original version of ‘Say Those Magic Words’ later covered by the UK Birds.
The Cryan Shames – the first of two Chicago bands in the mix – are best known for their version of ‘Sugar and Spice’, but in my humble opinion, ‘Ben Franklin’s Almanac’ on the local Destination label is their garagiest effort, with a fantastic, fuzzed out breakdown.

Dig – if you will – the crazed, quasi-instrumental madness of ‘Out In the Street’ from the Rationals. One of the major Detroit bands of the era, alongside the MC5, Bob Seger & the Last Heard and others, the Rationals recorded a number of outstanding 45s for A2, Cameo (including the mindblowingly Beatle-y ‘Feelin’ Lost’) and eventually an entire LP for the Crewe label. ‘Out In the Streets’ (the flip of a Goffin/King tune, ‘I Need You’) was later re-recorded with lyrics under the title ‘Sing’.
I’ve never been able to track down much info about the Lime, other than the fact that they hailed from Ohio. I found this record (complete with a groovy picture sleeve of the band in white jeans and dark blazers) in a weird little record store in suburban NJ over 20 years ago. How the original, Ohio issue of this 45 (several copies in fact, some of which were picked up by a buddy of mine) ended up in Keyport, NJ is a mystery. The record with it’s a-side ‘Love a Go Go’ was picked up and issued nationally on Chess, and is a great slice of garage pop.
I’ve always been a big fan of the Strangeloves, even though the first time I heard ‘Night Time’ it was via a cover by – wait for it, here it comesGeorge Thorogood & the Destroyers back in the 70’s. They made a grip of very cool garage/frat style 45s (including the original version of ‘I Want Candy’) in the mid 60’s, of which ‘Night Time’ is the finest. The coolest thing about the band – which I wasn’t aware of until years after I started collecting their 45s – is that they claimed to be three Australian brothers named Giles, Miles and Niles Strange, when they were in fact Bob Feldman, Jerry Goldstein and Richard Gottehrer. Gottehrer went on to play a major role in New York-based punk and new wave as co-founder of Sire Records.
Back in the day, I – like many of my garage/mod cohorts – was introduced to Sean Bonniwell and the Music Machine via the Rhino issue of their greatest hits. I thought then, and still believe now that they were, unlike many of their ilk, actually a really good band with much more to offer than just their hit 45 ‘Talk Talk’. ‘Masculine Intuition’ is one side of their best Original Sound 45 (the flip of ‘The People In Me’) and is – like much of their work – a great slice of intelligent, slightly dark garage/psyche/pop.
The British Walkers were a DC-based band that released a number of excellent 45s during the mid-60’s. Over the course of their career, the lineup included both Roy Buchanan (who I believe is on this record) and John Hall (later of Orleans). ‘Diddley Daddy’ – a cover of fellow DC-ite Bo (Diddley that is) – is a wailing, grungy slice of bluesy garage. Oddly enough, the flip (which I’ll definitely feature here in the future) ‘I Found You’ is a wonderful, Beatle-esque pop record.
The Guilloteens (how cool is that name??) were a Memphis-based teen group that were reportedly Elvis Presley’s fave local band. They recorded a couple of 45s for the HBR label – including the savage ‘Hey You’ – and at least one for Columbia. ‘For My Own’ is a groovy, slightly fuzzed bit of garage folk.
I don’t know much about the Sidekicks, other than they were probably from the suburbs of New York City (maybe Long Island). Their RCA 45 ‘Not Now’ (with a cover of the Hollies ‘Fifi the Flea’ on the flip) features a very cool guitar solo.
Things close out with one of my fave sides by Chicago’s own New Colony Six. If you can get your hands on a copy of the ‘Best of’ CD that came out some years ago, do so as the NC6 made some fantastic records during their existence. They were capable of garage, R&B, and the sweet, sophisticated pop that brought them their biggest success in the late-60’s. ‘Let Me Love You’ is a great mix of garagey energy and psychedelic touches.
So, I hope you dig the mix (if you tend to download the zip files, check out the mix too as I dug up some cool soundbytes).
 

Peace
Larry

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The Equals – My Life Ain’t Easy

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The Equals (Eddy Grant in blond wig…)

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Listen – My Life Ain’t Easy – MP3

Greetings all.
I said I might not be back this week, but as is usually the case, was – like Michael Corleone – sucked back in.
The track I bring you today is by far my favorite tune by one of my all-time fave unsung bands the Equals.
I’ve posted about the Equals before – over at Funky16Corners – and that piece has the biographical details (however brief), but there’s a story associated with this tune, so here it is.
Way, way back in the day, when New Wave was just beginning to morph into “alternative” (blechh) my brothers and I were digging heavily on the Plimsouls ‘Everywhere at Once’ LP. In addition to the group’s many great originals (especially the “hit” ‘A Million Miles Away’), there were two covers on that album, that would not be revealed to me as such for many years.
The first of these was ‘Lie Beg Borrow & Steal’ (which was originally recorded by Texas punks Mouse & the Traps, and which I will certainly feature in this space in the future). The origins of that particular song were exposed a few years after I heard the Plimsouls version when I saw the Gripweeds cover it. Like a rube, I walked up to the band and said something to the effect of “Great Plimsouls cover!”, and was immediately – as the kids say – “schooled”. Not long after that I dug up a copy of the OG, and it remains to this day one of my fave 60’s punkers.
The second tune was the Equals ‘My Life Ain’t Easy’. I labored under the delusion that this was a Plimsouls tune for well over 15 years, until one fateful day, when I was watching reruns of the Gerry & Sylvia Anderson show ‘UFO’, and I heard a different version of the song playing in the background of a scene. I knew that ‘UFO’ predated the Plimsouls significantly, so off I went to the interwebs. It was there that I discovered that the tune had originally been performed by the Equals (a band that I already owned several 45s by). Now I really felt like a chump.
Initially, I was only able to track down an import ‘best of’ comp that included the song, but a few years on I found the copy of the 45 you’re listening to today.
One of the things I really love about the Equals is that their sound was an ever changing blend of various styles, from rock and soul to rock steady and psychedelia. Though the group had a significant amount of success in Europe, and a few minor hits in the US, this musical shapeshifting probably had something to do with their inability to hit the charts in a more significant fashion.
‘My Life Ain’t Easy’ leans over into the rock side of things, like many of their best sides hanging in a post-Freakbeat/pre-Glam grey area inhabited by big (BIG) guitars and pop hooks. The guitar riff is for me the finest element of this record, sounding as if the reverb and volume had been layered on several times.
Quite groovy.
So, have a great Thanksgiving, and a great weekend.
Make sure to check the JamNow link over at Funky16Corners so you can listen in to the Asbury Park 45 Session on Friday night.
If I can find the time this weekend, I may be assembling the very first Iron Leg garage punk podcast.
Peace
Larry

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Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart – Where Angels Go Trouble Follows

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Boyce & Hart

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Listen – Where Angels Go Trouble Follows – MP3

Greetings all.
All is well here in NJ, where the weekend was spent catching up on sleep, errands and the like. Nothing too stressful, and good for that because it was cold and rainy out, warm and toasty inside and no one felt too much like “activity” anyway.
So anyway…
I took advantage of the spare time – as it were – to catch up on some blog work I had waiting, mainly assembling the Funky16Corners Podcast Archive, which I’ve been threatening to do for months. I only recently recovered the missing files (thanks to a loyal reader) and so the task was undertaken. If you dig funk and soul, and happen to have an MP3 player with that needs some funk and soul in it, then you could do worse things than fall by and download some goodness.
I’ve also been listening to music (I do that sometimes). I’ve been digging on some Smithsonian/Folkways recordings of Elizabeth Cotton. Cotton – much like one of my all-time faves Mississippi John Hurt – was a songster and guitar stylist of the old school and is a real pleasure to listen to. Her guitar playing was wonderful, and I dig hearing the “original” versions of tunes later covered by the likes of the Grateful Dead and Davy Graham among others. The two CDs I’ve found in the last few weeks have been – and will continue to be – in heavy rotation.
While I’m posting today, I’m not sure what else I’ll get up on the blog this week (at least before next weekend). This Thursday is Thanksgiving, and as I work in the production end of the newspaper business, the next few days will be a hell of compressed work. Thursday I’ll be away for the holiday, and Friday night I’ll be spinning rare funk and soul at the latest installment of the Asbury Park 45 Sessions (in Asbury Park, NJ), which, if those sounds are your bag, you should most definitely drop by and soak up the grooves.
Today’s selection is one of my fave pieces of 60’s pop, that I knew of, but was unable to track down for many years.
The tune ‘Where Angles Go Trouble Follows’ is the theme from the 1968 movie of the same name. Not a great film by any standards, the flick is still one of my favorite examples of ‘mainstream’ Hollywood assaults on the youth market of the time. In many ways painfully square – no doubt the product of old school, cigar chomping screen hacks* – the film still managed to tap into the innocent side of the youth culture of the time, and is a suitably glossy artifact.
Starring Rosalind Russell** as the Mother Superior of a Catholic Girls School***, and Stella Stevens (?!?!? Va va va VOOM!) as her socially conscious younger counterpart, the story follows a busload of nuns and schoolgirls (one of whom was played by a young Susan St. James) on their way across country to attend a protest rally. At one point in the film, the girls attend a mixer at a boys school, and an anonymous band performs the theme song.
If memory serves, the version of the song you’re listening to – performed by songwriters Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart – played over the closing credits (It’s been a while since I last saw the film, so I may be mistaken).
Anyway, for years (pre-interwebs) I looked for a copy of the song, but was never able to turn up a copy. Then, some years ago a local vinyl shop came into a huge collection of vinyl from a radio station, and while digging through it, I just happened upon a Tommy Boyce/Bobby Hart picture sleeve 45, which just happened to have ‘Where Angels Go Trouble Follows’ on it.
Listening to the cut, it’s not hard to imagine how Boyce & Hart had so much success writing for the Monkees (and having a decent amount of pop success on their own), as the song would have fit perfectly in that bands discography. The verse is fairly light and fluffy, but the chorus is a killer but of Sunset Strip, au-go-go pop, conjuring images of frugging, technicolor scenesters.
So, the next time the flick pops up on Turner Classic Movies or somesuch (NOT the first “angels” film, the Hayley Mills vehicle ‘The Trouble With Angels’), check it out.
Peace
Larry

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*The ne plus ultra of which is ‘How To Committ Marriage’, with Jackie Gleason, Bob Hope and Professor Irwin Corey as the ‘Baba Ziba’

** Not to mention Van Johnson and Arthur Godfrey as priests?!?!
*** The building used as the location for the school is right around the block from my parent’s house in Ft. Washington, PA

Rick Nelson – Don’t Make Promises

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Mr. Rick Nelson

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Listen – Don’t Make Promises – MP3

Greetings all.
I wasn’t sure if I was going to get something posted in the second half of the week (lots of real stuff to take care of) but a small window opened up in the schedule, so here I am.
Today’s selection is another one of those records that I happened up on during the old days of bootleg video trading, some 20 years ago). The long lost individual who had duped me a few cassettes worth of stuff had stuffed the end of the second tape with what first appeared to be filler, e.g. a clip of the Tijuana Brass with the Seven Dwarfs at Disneyland playing ‘America’ from West Side Story (I assure you this was NOT a hallucination).
It took me a while to make it all the way through to the end of the tape (after rewatching the 13th Floor Elevators countless times), but when I did I made a couple of nice discoveries.
One of these was a song that I had never heard before, being performed by someone I couldn’t immediately identify (as I’ve said before the quality of these tapes left a lot to be desired). After several viewings I figured out that the singer was Rick Nelson, and the song was a cover of Tim Hardin’s ‘Don’t Make Promises’.
Aside from the fact that I ought to have been ashamed of myself for not knowing that song (which quickly became a favorite), I had to get over the shock that Rick Nelson had recorded anything between ‘Hello Mary Lou’ and ‘Garden Party’.
I had no idea….
Despite the fact that he is often lumped in with bland pop stars of his day, Nelson was no slouch. Though he made some lightweight records, he was also capable of real rock’n’roll, and even the occasionally searing rockabilly track (if you don’t believe me, track down his version of ‘Milk Cow Blues’ which is positively DEADLY). At the height of his early career, it probably didn’t matter much that Nelson’s fame was largely the result of his TV stardom because “authenticity” in rock musicians had not yet fully formed as a concept. This is not to say that there weren’t more authentic rockers in his day (nor that Nelson had some authenticity of his own), but rather than almost nobody cared.
So, Nelson was a mega-star (I think the biggest selling artist in the history of Imperial Records) in both records and TV, but like so many of his era, things trailed off post-British Invasion.
By the mid-60’s, following the cancellation of ‘Ozzie and Harriet’, Nelson was adrift in a scene where for a rock musician, nothing mattered more than authenticity.
His interest in country music had grown, so much so that in 1966 he recorded the ‘Bright Lights and Country Music’ LP, which consisted entirely of country covers, and featured no less a master than Clarence White, as well as longtime Nelson sideman James Burton.
Through the second half of the 60’s Nelson drifted between country, bland pop and forays into more serious material. By 1969, when he recorded the ‘Another Side of Rick’ LP, he was just about to make a serious change in direction. Though that LP contained a fair amount of dross, it also included some very nice folk rock, as well as a curious step into the world of pop-psychedelia (‘Marshmallow Skies”) that I’ll have to post up some time in the future.
Nelson’s version of ‘Don’t Make Promises’ takes the tune from it’s somewhat more austere original version by Tim Hardin and recasts it in a slightly slicker pop style. Oddly enough Nelson, who had flirted extensively with country, strips the slight Nashville edge from Hardin’s arrangement.
No matter how he was presented (or presented himself) on ‘Another Side of Rick’, his next album would be a shot across the bow as it were. ‘Rick Nelson In Concert: The Troubador 1969’ would feature a long(er) haired Nelson on the cover, playing a decidedly long(er) haired music in the grooves. The album, which features bass and backing vocals by future Eagle Randy Meisner is – for anyone familiar only with Nelson’s 50’s hits – a revelation. It can stand proudly along side country rock albums from the same period by the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers, and – though it charted respectably – should have been the record that remade Nelson as a force in music. As it was, it would be three more years before his next substantial hit, ‘Garden Party’.
Unfortunately, the rest of his career – up to his tragic death in 1985 – never brought him the respect he deserved.
If you get a chance, comb the used book stores for Joel Selvin’s excellent biography of Nelson.
Peace
Larry

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Buy Another Side of Rick – on Amazon.com

Dick Hyman – The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

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Mr. Dick Hyman

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Listen – The Man From U.N.C.L.E.- MP3

Greetings all.
I’m back from my mini-vacation, and I just finished refilling the Iron Leg warehouse with new sounds for the coming months.
Back in the day, when I was probably about 13 or 14, I went with my father to see a concert by a group called the Soprano Summit. The sopranos in question – lest you think I was dragged to some prehistoric version of the Three Tenors – were soprano saxophones, played by two masters of the instrument, Bob Wilber and Kenny Davern (both sadly deceased). Though I didn’t know it at the time, both concerts I saw by this group (spaced about a year apart) featured all-star jazz lineups. Though I can’t recall which time featured which mix of players, I was lucky enough to see players like bassist George Duvivier, drummers Connie Kay (who played with the Modern Jazz Quartet and on Van Morrison’s ‘Astral Weeks’) and Bobby Rosengarden (Dick Cavett’s bandleader), guitarist Bucky Pizzarelli (father of the famous John) and pianists Dick Wellstood and Dick Hyman.
Though all of these players were familiar to my Dad, I had no idea who any of them were at the time.
This was of course remedied over the years, especially during the late 80’s and early 90s when I immersed myself in jazz.
Oddly enough, the name Dick Hyman wouldn’t become meaningful until years later when I started to DJ.
Hyman, who in addition to being an accomplished jazz pianist (and later composing soundtracks for Woody Allen films) was a busy studio musician, and more importantly a pioneer in playing and recording with electronic keyboards, especially the Moog synthesizer. Hyman’s Moog recordings have become sought after by DJs as sample fodder, as well as being embraced by the Easy/Now Sound crowd.
My favorite Hyman album just happens to be (no surprise here) one of his organ sessions, 1965’s ‘The Man from O.R.G.A.N.’.
Another in a long line of pop culture attempts to capitalize on the spy movie craze, the LP featured Hyman working it out on several movie and TV themes, including today’s selection, the theme from ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E’.
Largely forgotten today – except of course by people with good taste (or those old enough to have seen it the first time around)- ‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E’ ran on NBC from 1964 to 1968 and featured Robert Vaughn and David McCallum as agents Napoleon Solo and Ilya Kuryakin respectively. The series (which had a spin-off in ‘The Girl from U.N.C.L.E.’) was a mid-60’s pop-cult masterwork, combining international intrigue with a mod vibe and just enough humor to keep things from getting too heavy. There was even an episode (which I used to have a bootleg copy of) that featured Sonny and Cher.
The theme – for which he won an Emmy Award – was written by Jerry Goldsmith, and is one of my all-time fave “spy” themes. Hyman more than does the tune justice, with a groovy arrangement that replaces the lead guitar with organ.
I don’t know if The Man from O.R.G.A.N.’ has ever been reissued, but it’s not too hard to find out n the field, and if organ LPs, spy soundtracks or both are your bag, you ought to grab yourself a copy.
Peace
Larry

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Sagittarius – Another Time

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Curt Boettcher

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Nice scanning job, huh?

Listen – Another Time – MP3

Greetings all.
This’ll be a relatively quick one, as the family is preparing for a short getaway and things need to be done (of the non-blog variety).
The name Curt Boettcher looms large in the world of Sunshine Pop. He was the co-leader of Sagittarius (as much as any non performing studio project has a “leader”) and the mastermind behind the Millennium.
My history with Boettcher’s oeuvre has been a touch and go affair for many years. Though I initially found much of his work almost sugary sweet (I’ve heard it described as “cloying”), a deeper listen reveals that Boettcher was both a talented songwriter and a craftsman in the studio.
I guess the problem is that – to borrow an awful mid-70’s self-actualization turn of phrase – your head has to be in the right place to “get” Sagittarius and Millennium.
The problem is not that Boettcher’s work is bubblegummy – and it is at times, but no more so than any mid-60’s pop musician – but that it is occasionally so light and dreamy that it seems in danger of catching the breeze and blowing away. Listening to some of the songs on ‘Present Tense’ and the Millennium ‘Begin’ LP, it’s sometimes jarring how far removed this music is from ‘rock’.
While many UK bands were mining some of the same territory, few of them, even at their most baroque, twee and precious were able to approach Boettcher’s Percy Faith on acid vibe. There’s almost (for lack of a better word) a naivete at work (the same kind of vibe I get from Free Design) that moves between childlike and childish, and really requires multiple listens to reveal the complexity beneath the surface. Boettcher’s melodies are marked by a sophistication that isn’t always well served by the sometimes thick layers of strings and angelic backing vocals.
Listening to some of the tracks on ‘Present Tense’, there is the initial temptation to say what Boettcher and Gary Usher were creating was little more than a highly polished, ‘younger’ twist on syrupy, orchestrated pop, but the more you listen, the more it becomes obvious that there’s something deeper at work here. Not hugely deeper, but deeper nonetheless.
There are those that would line up Boettcher next to someone like Brian Wilson, but with all of his faults, I find Wilson – over the long haul – to be a much more interesting songwriter and producer. However, there are moments in Boettcher’s comparatively brief discography where he created exquisite pop records.
One of these is today’s selection, ‘Another Time’, the lead off track (and I believe the first single) from ‘Present Tense’. The song sports one of Boettcher’s most memorable melodies, with a bit at the end of the chorus that is absolute perfection. I love the way the arrangement builds in waves from the quietest plucking of harp strings to a shimmering wall of sound built with layer after layer of vocals.
Sundazed has done excellent reissues of ‘Present Tense’ and ‘Begin’, with the Millennium set bordering on the ridiculously comprehensive with a wealth of outtakes, and tracks by Boettcher’s earlier groups.
I’ll be away for the rest of the week, so stay well.
Peace
Larry

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*Though Sagittarius is largely associated with Curt Boettcher project, it was begun by Gary Usher, who produced and arranged the LP (with the exception of a few completed Ballroom tracks that Boettcher brought to the project).

The Peanut Gallery – Out of Breath

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(Below) Not label honcho Ken Handler,

but the doll that bore his name (really)

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Listen – Out of Breath – MP3

Greetings all.
I hope the weekend finds you well (that it finds you at all, loitering about the interwebs with nothing else to do…).
Today’s selection is a longtime resident of my garage crates, and though I can tell you precious little about the group that recorded (so little in fact as to be practically nothing at all), there is in fact an interesting story surrounding it.
I probably picked up ‘Out of Breath’ by the Peanut Gallery more than 20 years ago (pre portable) and did so on the strength of the Canterbury label. I already had sides by the Yellow Balloon (the group that brought Canterbury its biggest hit) and the New Breed (like most groups on the label, painfully obscure but musically interesting).
So, I grab the record, which if memory serves was quite cheap, got it hope, slapped it on the tables and was, how do they say, gobsmacked.
While I was expecting (hoping for) garage punk, what came spilling out of the speakers was a horse of a slightly different color/sound. The Peanut Gallery – whoever they were – created a record that was an admixture equal parts, Sunset Strip pop, folk rock and utterly insane garage madness.
Things get started calmly enough, with a lead vocal that gives no clue as what’s coming. As soon as the chorus starts, things start to build, and build, until the end of the song where the vocalist seems to be going a little bit insane, tearing his hair out, knocking over instruments and wreaking all manner of havoc in the studio. While the contrast between the verse and the chorus is jarring, I like to think they kind of balance each other out in the end, making for an intriguing 45.
In the years since, I have neither seen another copy of this record, nor have I been able to find anything out about the group, even in these thoroughly Goog-ly times.
However (dot, dot, dot)
Here are some other interesting facts about Canterbury Records:
As I said, I already had a couple of Canterbury sides, one of which was ‘Yellow Balloon’, by (of course) the Yellow Balloon, a group that included in its ranks none other than the lead singer of the Greefs, aka Robbie Douglas, aka (in actuality) actor/singer Don Grady (of ‘My Three Sons’).
The label itself was L.A. based, and run by a cat named Ken Handler, whose mother just happened to be Ruth Handler, inventor of the Barbie doll. If you haven’t figured it out yet, her son gave his name to Barbie’s long time companion, that being Ken.
During its mid-to-late 60’s run, Canterbury issued a bunch of pop records, including those by Group Therapy and Lisa Miller who had previously recorded as Little Lisa on the Motown subsidiary VIP. Not coincidentally, Miller was the daughter of Kay Lewis of the Lewis Sisters, who also wrote and recorded for VIP, and moved on to be the A&R people for, here it comes, Canterbury Records (where they also wrote).
Canterbury also released swell regarded soul sides by Sandy Wynns, aka Edna Wright, later of Invictus/HotWax hitmakers the Honeycone.
So, once again the Iron Leg guarantee is fulfilled. If I can’t find anything out about the artist, I’ll track down something interesting in the periphery.
Hope you dig the song.
Peace
Larry

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