Iron Leg Digital Trip #8 – Wood, Wire & Wind

Example

Richard & Mimi Farina

Listen/Download 54MB Mixed MP3 – MP3

Download 46MB ZIP File-

Playlist

Sandy Bull – Gospel Tune (Vanguard)
Gordon Lightfoot – For Lovin’ Me (WB)
Mimi & Richard Farina – Dandelion River Run (Vanguard)
Fred Neil – The Other Side of This Life (Elektra)
Turley Richards – Then I’ll Go Away (WB)
John Fahey – Sunflower River Blues (Takoma)
Tom Rush – The Cuckoo (Elektra)
Dave Van Ronk – Come Back Baby (Folkways)
Eric Andersen – Violets of Dawn (Vanguard)
John Hammond Jr – See That My Grave Is Kept Clean (Vanguard)
Emmitt Rhodes – Golden Child of God (ABC/Dunhill)
John Fahey – John Henry Variations (Takoma)

NOTE: As of 10pm Sunday night EST I realized that when I created this post I copied a URL (for the zip file) and forgot to change the number at the end, so anyone who downloaded the ZIP file got the tunes from the LAST (Vol 7) podcast, not the current one (Vol 8 ) . I just fixed this. Sorry for the inconvenience. – Larry

Greetings all.
As I mentioned last week, thanks to some digs during my DC trip last week I was inspired to work up a new podcast, which you see before you. Ironically enough, nothing from those digs is included, as when I started to digi-ma-tize the vinyl the record that triggered the mix in the first place just didn’t seem to fit. You know how it is. When inspirado hits, you just follow the wind…
Anyway, what you see and hear before you may seem – at first glance – to be a somewhat severe departure from the usual goings on hereabouts.
However….(big however here), bear with me and the stylistic tangents will be revealed, as well as a lot of great music.
When I was growing up, there were three basic kinds of music in my house. Jazz, Classical, and to a much smaller extent artifacts of the early 60’s commercial folk music boom. Some of this – the Kingston Trio for instance – didn’t hit me at all. Other stuff, like Peter, Paul & Mary stuck with me and remains a part of my listening today. I mention this because it was these earnest folks with their acoustic guitars that led me to dig deeper (as is always the case) leading me first to their ancestors, i.e. Pete Seeger and the Weavers, and then on to their more, how do they say, “serious” fellow travelers.
It was via these musicians that I eventually found my way to the Delta Blues, and then on to a more developed, singer-songwritery sound of people like Nick Drake and Jake Thackray who might only be described as “folk” be those to whom the mere presence of an acoustic guitar would qualify an artist thusly.
The tunes in this mix run the gamut from forward thinking experimentalists like Sandy Bull and John Fahey, to interpretations of folk & blues by many who would go on to careers as singer/songwriters themselves like Tom Rush and Fred Neil.
Overall, while some of the music in this mix – which pretty much span the 1960’s – is ‘folk’, in that the songs are modern interpretations of much older folk and blues standards like ‘The Cuckoo’ (from various Appalachian sources) and ‘See That My Grave is Kept Clean’ (originated by Blind Lemon Jefferson), many of the songs are wholly modern and move well into the realm of popular music, carrying the ‘folk’ label only because they were presented by someone playing an acoustic guitar (as well as the proximity of many of these performers to folk scenes – like Greenwich Village and Cambridge – and festivals of the era).
The mix opens with – oddly enough – a rare electric guitar performance by Sandy Bull, entitled simply ‘Gospel Tune’. Bull was – like John Fahey – a master of confounding expectation and playing games with accepted musical forms. He mixed blues, jazz, folk and Eastern sounds (he was an accomplished oud player) freely over the course of several albums for Vanguard and a few smaller labels. Recorded in 1963, ‘Gospel Tune’ references the playing of Pop Staples and is a lengthy improvisation with Bull accompanying himself on hi-hat cymbal.
Gordon Lightfoot is best known for his pop hits in the 1970s, but during the 60’s he was a major part of the Canadian folk movement. I first heard the song ‘For Lovin’ Me’ on one of my Dad’s Peter Paul & Mary LPs, and found Lightfoot’s original while digging last year. Interestingly enough, the flipside of this 45 ‘I’m Not Sayin’ was covered a few years later by Nico on one of her first (pre-Velvets) 45s.
Mimi & Richard Farina were two of the bigger stars of the more serious side of the mid-60’s folk boom. Mimi was the sister of Joan Baez, Richard was a published author (and college friend of none other than Thomas Pynchon) whose novel ‘Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me’ is a cult classic. ‘Dandelion River Run’ is an instrumental from their first LP, with Mimi on guitar and Richard on dulcimer.
If you know Fred Neil at all, it’s probably via the fact that he is the composer of the song ‘Everybody’s Talkin’, a huge hit for Nilsson from the soundtrack to the film ‘Midnight Cowboy’. Neil was also the composer of ‘The Dolphins’ (covered by Tim Buckley) and oddly enough of ‘The Bag I’m In’ known to garage punk fans by the version by Texas punkers the Fabs. The tune in this mix, ‘The Other Side of This Life’ was later covered – at a much more energetic pace – by the Jefferson Airplane.
I don’t know much about Turley Richards, other than he was blind, and has recorded a number of albums since the late 60’s. I picked up two of his albums at a record show because the looked interesting, and I’m glad I did because of tunes like ‘Then I’ll Go Away’.
John Fahey was one of the great musical mavericks of the last 40 years. Though he recorded primarily on acoustic guitar, he was far more than a ‘folk’ artist, pretty much defining the term “alternative” decades before it came into popular use to describe music. He mixed Appalachian styles with blues fingerpicking, jazz and avant garde ideas into a style all his own. ‘Sunflower River Blues’ (the first of two Fahey songs in this mix) is a great example of his sound.
Tom Rush was one of those 60’s folkies who went on to bigger and better things as a singer/songwriter (if you haven’t, check out his LP ‘The Circle Game’). His version of the old Appalachian song ‘The Cuckoo’ – recorded countless times by artists as far afield as the clawhammer banjoist Dock Boggs, Big Brother & the Holding Company  and West Coast psychedelics the Kaleidoscope – is a fairly subdued version of a fairly intense song.
I first saw (and heard) Dave Van Ronk on a PBS special (it may have been a Phil Ochs memorial concert) when I was a kid. He was one of my favorite singers (in any genre) and a great interpreter not only of folk and blues but of all manner of popular song, including a fantastic LP of Bertolt Brecht songs. His version of the folk/blues standard ‘Come Back Baby’ is stark and haunting.
Eric Andersen’s ‘Violets of Dawn’ may be familiar to garage fans via the excellent cover by the Daily Flash. Of the many Andersen tunes that were frequently covered, this is by far the most common and is one of the earlier examples of acoustic music mutating into 60’s pop, right alongside the sounds of Bob Dylan.
John Hammond Jr. was – if you hadn’t already figured it out – the son of the famous John Hammond Sr., discoverer of many a great musician from Billie Holiday to Bruce Springsteen. Hammond Jr. always stuck to the blues side of things, even working early version of what might be described as folk rock. His version of Blind Lemon Jefferson’s ‘See That My Grave Is Kept Clean’ may not be as stark as the original, but it’s still pretty intense.
Emitt Rhodes is really the odd man out in this grouping. Rhodes got his start in the mid-60’s pop group the Palace Guard, moving on to greater fame as the leader of the Merry Go Round, and then on to a few excellent McCartney-esque one-man-band LPs in the early 70’s. ‘Golden Child of God’ is from one of those LPs, and has long been a favorite song of mine.
Things come to a close with another favorite, ‘John Henry Variations’ by John Fahey. I love the gentle way this tune progresses, which reminds me a lot of another big fave, Mississippi John Hurt.
That all said, I hope you dig the sounds, and I promise I’ll be back later in the week with some more fuzz.
Peace
Larry

Example

PS Head over to Funky16Corners for Wilson Pickett!

The Hombres – Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)

Example

The Hombres

Example

Listen – Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out) – MP3

Greetings all.
The end of the week is coming up fast, and strangely enough so is my energy threshold. I’m sitting here, when I really ought to be sleeping, and instead (of course) I’m writing.
Can’t help it…
The wife and kids are away visiting my in-laws for a few days, so – as is always the case when they’re away – I’m engaged in a marathon vinyl recording/blog posting marathon. Tonight I dug out and digi-ma-tized enough vinyl for two new mixes (one for here and one for Funky16Corners), and I’m writing posts for both blogs (one of which you’re currently reading).
I ought to be spreading the work out over two days, but Thursday is my heavy day at work, at the end of which my brain is usually good and dented, and I am unable to string together coherent sentences.
So…here I am now.
Today’s selection is one of those tunes that was a Top 40 hit in it’s day, yet I never heard it played even once in the 35 or so years I’ve been listening to the radio. I first heard the Hombres’ ‘Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)’ on an early CD comp of MGM and Mercury Records-related pop hits that I picked up sometime in the late-80’s. There, alongside the Sir Douglas Quintet, Every Mothers Son, Janis Ian and the New Colony Six were the Hombres.
As I said, I’d never heard of the band before, but as soon as I heard ‘Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)’ with its ‘Gloria’-esque combo organ riff, hand claps and Bizarro World Bob Dylan lyrics, I knew it was a keeper.
The Hombres were a Memphis, TN band that started their career as a road version of ‘Ronnie & the Daytonas’. The band, which included organist B.B. Cunningham (whose brother Bill was in the Box Tops) was signed to Verve after recording with Huey Meaux (and changing their name from the Bandits to the Hombres) released ‘Let It Out (Let It All Hang Out)’ in the Fall of 1967. It remained on the charts for several weeks, just missing the Top 10. The Hombres would release a few more singles (and an LP) for Verve before breaking up in 1969.
I hope you dig it.
With any luck, I’ll be back on Monday with a new (and unusual) mix.
If you’re in NJ, and you dig the sounds of soul and funk spun on 45, head down to the World Famous Asbury Lanes on Friday night (3/28) for the latest installment of the Asbury Park 45 Sessions.
Peace
Larry

Example

PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a historic set by Otis Redding.

The Clique – Splash 1

Example

The Clique

Example

Listen – Splash 1 – MP3

Greetings all.
I have returned from far afield, tired as hell, but ironically enough, relaxed as well. The family and I spent a long weekend in Washington, DC, and managed to do lots of cool stuff. I even worked in a couple of quick vinyl stops in between sights, so I’ll have some cool stuff to share with you all in the coming weeks.
I picked up a couple of things that have inspired me to whip up a new mix (pre-empting the second part of the UK psyche mix for a few weeks) for next week, so you have that to look forward to as well.
A few months back I featured the original version of ‘Superman’ by a Texas band called the Clique. It was in that article that I mentioned that the Clique’s first 45 had been the very first cover of a 13th Floor Elevators tune, that being ‘Splash 1’.
The tune, which originally appeared on the first Elevators LP ‘Psychedelic Sounds of…’ in 1966, was one of the finest tunes on that landmark album, with a uniquely mournful vibe that stood in stark contrast to the wildness of ‘ You’re Gonna Miss Me’ and the lysergic swirl of ‘Fire Engine’.
The following year, the Clique recorded their version of ‘Splash 1’ at the Andrus Studio (same place the Elevators recorded). The 45, released on the local Cinema label went on to be a regional hit, eventually being issued on Scepter.
It wasn’t long after I wrote about the Clique and ‘Superman’ that I was tipped off about an auction for the Cinema 45, and managed to pick it up at not too dear a price.
The Clique’s approach to the song is a touch speedier than the original, with harmony vocals that add a slight pop twist to the desolation of the original. It may not be to the tastes of hardcore Elevators partisans, but I think it’s pretty cool.
I hope you dig it, and I’ll see you later in the week.
Peace
Larry

Example

PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for some very solid San Francisco blue-eyed soul, circa 1967.

PSS Thanks Helen…

The Gentrys – Don’t Send Me No Flowers

Example

The Gentrys

Example

Listen – Don’t Send Me No Flowers – MP3

Greetings all.
I hope everything’s cool on your end.
Things are groovy hereabouts with the Funky16Corners/Iron Leg family preparing to hit the road for a little vacation during which rest and relaxation will be the order of the day. Good times are expected to be had, and if I’m lucky I might even get in a little vinyl excavation. As it stands, I probably won’t get anything new posted (after today) until at least next Tuesday, so if you’re jonesing for some sounds, head on over to the Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive and listen to a mix (or two, or three) until I get back.
A few weeks ago over at Funky16Corners I did a post about a slamming funk track that – after quite a bit of digging and a lucky break – I discovered had been written (in 1968) by the very same man who went on to reap AM gold with the song ‘You Light Up My Life’ (the significance being that there’s no telling where life will take you, as well as highlighting the bizarre yin/yang of those two songs).
The tune I bring you today led me down a similarly circuitous path, ending up in pretty much the same place (though a few more years down the line).
I first heard the song ‘Don’t Send Me No Flowers’ back in the mid-80’s during the height of my garage/mod days. That version, by a Memphis, TN band called the Breakers on one of the Pebbles volumes impressed me immediately with it’s potent blend of fuzz and teen garage snot. It was a few years later that a digging expedition yielded the first LP by the Gentrys, another – much more successful – band from Memphis. While listening to that very LP I heard a familiar tune, that being the Gentrys’ version of ‘Don’t Send me No Flowers’. I wondered who had recorded the song first, and as this was years prior to the invention of the interwebs, I remained clueless on this matter (and several others we won’t get into).
So, many years pass, and I start this here blog, and while I was digi-ma-tizing some tunes for inclusion herein I just happened to grab that Gentrys Lp off the shelf.
Now, for those of you that don’t know, the Gentrys hit the Top 40 in 1965 with the tune ‘Keep On Dancing’. Over the next seven years (including a period when the band was dissolved and then reformed) they recorded a few LPs and a number of 45s for MGM, Bell, Capitol and even a late version of Sun (I happen to have the Sun LP and will post something from it in the future).
For the longest time, aside from ‘Keep On Dancing’ the only thing I knew about the Gentrys was that their ranks included a singer named Jimmy Hart, who would go on to even greater fame as professional wrestling “manager” ‘The Mouth of the South’ Jimmy Hart.
So, I get out that Gentrys album, record ‘Don’t Bring me No Flowers’ and decide that the time is long since passed when I ought to get the whole story. The first question was, who was the “Weiss” credited with writing the song. There was no one by that name in the Gentrys, so I assumed (mistakenly, of course) that Weiss must have been someone in the Breakers.
Incorrecto…
As it turns out, the Gentrys recorded the song first, in 1965, with the Breakers following at least a year later (and around the same time by a Danish group called Sir Henry & his Butlers). A little more digging, and I discovered that the composer of the song was in fact a woman named Donna Weiss.
As it turns out, Weiss was a local Memphis songwriter, who wrote a bunch of other tunes, including the oft recorded ‘Stay With me Baby’ (Walker Brothers, Long John Baldry, Terry Reid, Marmalade), and, some years later with the assistance of Jackie DeShannon, a little number known as ‘Bette Davis Eyes’(?!?).
This was in and of itself (very) surprising, but my initial shock was in discovering that this garage classic had been written by a woman. Garage punk – despite forays into the genre by some excellent female artists, notably the Pandoras – has always been a sound that ran on an amalgam of male chauvinism, fuzz guitar and bug-eyed bad attitude. While Weiss wasn’t the only female composer of a notable garage tune (check out ‘I Ain’t No Miracle Worker’ and ‘I Had Too Much To Dream Last Night’, both written by Nancie Mantz and Annette Tucker), she was fairly anomalous in this respect.
Either way, it’s a great song with an interesting story attached.
See you next week.
Peace
Larry

Example

PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a great “answer” record.

Jacques Dutronc – Et Moi Et Moi Et Moi

Example

Monsieur Jacques Dutronc

Example

Listen – Et Moi Et Moi Et Moi- MP3

Greetings all (or more appropriately, ‘Comment Allez Vous?’)
I hope everyone out there on the interwebs had an excellent weekend, and that you’re all ready for something very groovy with which to commence the week.
My history with Jacques Dutronc doesn’t really go back that far. Though I have been aware of his 60’s stuff for a while (thanks to an old mod pal), I only recently managed to add any of his vinyl to my arsenal.
In brief, Dutronc, who started out his musical career with the group El Toro et les Cyclones in 1963.
By the middle of the decade, he broke off on his own and started a career that would make him one of the biggest stars in France.
Dutronc – along with his co-writer Jacques Lanzmann – had started out writing material for other artists, but after a record company biggie heard Dutronc’s demos, he insisted that Jacques take his attitude and his matinee idol good looks and record them himself.
‘Et moi, et moi, et moi’ was written in 1966 as a parody of humorless, solipsistic protest folk singers, and if you check out the lyrics (in which the hugeness of the worlds probems are dwarfed by the minutae of the singer’s life) , it’s pretty evident that behind the Pretty Things/garage swagger was a pointed sense of humor. The coolest thing – at least for me – is that on first listen, as someone who doesn’t understand much conversational French (I can read it a little, despite three years of study under the deeply uninspiring tutelage of maybe the worst French teacher in the world), the initial impression is deeply groovy. It almost doesn’t matter what Dutronc is really saying because the record is dripping with attitude. This is trans-linguistic garage snot at its most potent, with the vibe being passed along via the sound of Dutronc’s voice and the rudimentary pounding of the band.
That the lyrics turn out to be so cool is an added benefit, but in the end probably unnecessary. It’s the same feeling I get when listening to Brazilian Tropicalia or Bossa Nova (all sung in Portuguese), much of which I’ve never seen translated. There’s enough feeling delivered in the music that the actual meaning of the words being sung becomes secondary*.
I’ m willing to admit that I may be in the minority in this viewpoint. My entire life (much of which has been devoted the appreciation (and occasional playing) of music) I’ve never been prone to focusing on lyrics **(at least not at first) taking a more impressionistic approach. Music has to get me in the gut (or the ears, I guess) first, with a riff or rhythm hitting me more directly than any direct message. This is not to say that there aren’t lyrics that mean a lot to me (i.e. Dylan, Nick Drake, Lou Reed with the Velvets, Leonard Cohen) but that in most cases it was the sound and the attitude of the music that grabbed me first, and this is certainly the case (once again) with Jacques Dutronc.
I’m sure there must be a clinical explanation for why I approach music this way, though I’d be hard pressed to explain which side of the nature/nurture divide it falls on. Is it the way I “learned” to appreciate music or is it something in the way my brain is wired? I certainly have no aversion to words (I’ve always been a voracious reader), and if you hit my blogs on any kind of a regular basis you know how much I like the blah blah blah. If you’re some kind of mad scientist that’s looking into this specific topic, drop me a line. I’d love to be turned into a lab rat to figure this all out.
Dutronc went on to record a grip of classic garage/freakbeat/psyche sides before turning his energies to the cinema in the early 70’s. He eventually married none other than Francoise Hardy. Interestingly enough, in 1973 Mungo Jerry (‘In the Summertime’) remade ‘Et Moi Et Moi Et Moi’ as ‘Alright Alright Alright’ and had a big hit with it in the UK.
See you later in the week.

Peace
Larry

Example

*Though it’s fair to note that I had some familiarity with the socio-political atmosphere surrounding the creation of Tropicalia when I first started listening to the music.

**I’m terrible at remembering lyrics. Back when I was in a band I always tried to write the simplest lyrics possible so that I could perform without messing them up.

PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a new female soul mix!

IL Meets F16C #3 – Every Little Bit Hurts

Example

Spencer Davis Group

Example

Example

Listen – Spencer Davis Group – Every Little Bit Hurts – MP3

Greetings all.
Greetings all, and welcome once again to the ‘Intersection of Iron Leg and Funky16Corners’.
The selections I bring you today – here and over at my funk and soul blog Funky16Corners – are two versions of the same song that I found during a recent vinyl excavation. Neither one is rare, but I think you’ll agree that they are both outstanding.
The original version of ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ was recorded by the artist featured at Funky16Corners, Brenda Holloway (make sure to head over and hear her original version), first for Del-Fi, and shortly afterward (and to much greater success) for Tamla/Motown in 1964.
The version featured here is a cover of the tune from the following year by the Spencer Davis Group.
Unless you’ve been living under a rock somewhere, you’ll probably already be aware of the Spencer Davis Group via their huge, mid-60’s hit ‘Gimme Some Loving’, the opening riff (and wailing organ) of which have become something close to musical shorthand for that decade. That, and the fact that the band was the starting point for the career of an otherwise unassuming Birmingham (UK) teenager named Steve Winwood.
The Spencer Davis Group was formed in 1963 in Birmingham, with Davis on guitar and vocals, Steve Winwood on keyboards/guitar/vocals, his brother Muff on bass and Pete York on drums. They had their first hit (in the UK) with their cover of Jackie Edwards’ ‘Keep On Running’ in 1965, and first hit the US Top 40 with that same song in January of 1966.
They recorded their cover of ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’ for their first UK LP in 1965 (where it was a hit) but the Spencer Davis Group recording of the song wouldn’t hit the US until it was included on their second US LP ‘I’m a Man’ in 1967 (the single actually charted briefly in Canada early that year).
The Spencer Davis Group take the tune at a slightly slower pace, with Winwood’s soulful vocal and piano taking the lead. Their interpretation of the song is a great exaple of UK musicians infatuation with American soul music (the song was also covered by the Small Faces). I’d even go as far as to say that Winwood’s interpretation is a touch bluesier that Holloway’s original.
Ironically, by the time US audiences were hearing Steve Winwood sing ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’, he had already been playing with Dave Mason, Jim Capaldi (from Deep Feeling) and Chris Wood (from Locomotive), and would shortly leave Spencer Davis to form Traffic. The Spencer Davis Group would continue to record and play without Winwood, and like the Tremeloes (without Brian Poole), and the Mindbenders ( without Wayne Fontana), their later recordings are actually pretty good. Not long after the formation of Traffic, both that band and the Spencer Davis Group would appear side by side on the soundtrack to ‘Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush’.
As always, I hope you dig the tune, and make sure to head over to Funky16Corners to check out the original version by Brenda Holloway.
Peace
Larry

Example

Remember to head over to Funky16Corners for the original version of ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’!

Primrose Circus – P.S. Call Me Lulu

Example

Listen – P.S. Call Me Lulu – MP3

Greetings all.
Sorry for the long time between posts, but week the last was quite busy, with work, life and even a little blog related vinyl to digital conversion on the schedule.
Today’s selection is – like the Peanut Gallery 45 I featured a while back – shrouded in an almost impenetrable shell of mystery. No matter how much I search, on paper or in the interwebs the Primrose Circus remains a pop enigma.
I first encountered the Primrose Circus and ‘PS Call Me Lulu’ many, many years ago during the peak of my garage/mod years when it was included on one of the Mindrocker comps. There, beside some excellent California garage was a slice of wistful, vaguely fuzzy pop that I fell in love with instantly. The tune quickly became a staple of my mix tapes, and years later, following the advent of the interwebs I began to search for a copy of the original 45. Oddly enough, that search only came to fruition in the last few months.
It was one of those weird instances where my want list and the Tao fell briefly into sync, where something prompted me to go do an Ebay search, and there, on the first try, after years of evading me sat a mint copy of the Primrose Circus 45 at a very reasonable “buy it now” price, and so, as you’ve probably already surmised, buy-it-then I did.
One thing that always surprised me was that the sole 45 by the Primrose Circus was released on a fairly well known/well traveled LA label, that being Mira (sister label to the legendary mostly-soul label Mirwood).
Mira and Mirwood were one of the major stops on the curriculum vitae of the brilliant Fred Smith. Smith was one of the most important figures in L.A.-based R&B, soul and funk during the 60’s and 70’s, best known for his association with the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band (though as far as I can tell he had nothing to do with the sounds herein).
For years, based on what I was able to dig up in the field, my assumption had been that Mirwood was pretty much the “soul” label, and Mira mostly garage and pop. However, once you take a look at the discographies it becomes evident that although there was a preponderance of one style or another on both labels (as stated above), both labels features a wide variety of sounds. Mirwood featured garage bands like the Bees and the Gas Co, but Mira had the Leaves, Primrose Circus, the Forum and others. Both labels featured soul, R&B and soul jazz, as well as odd bits of mainstream pop and novelty sides.
When I first heard ‘PS Call Me Lulu’ I would have dated it to 1966 or so, but as it turns out it wasn’t released until 1968. I’ve always considered it a prime example of mid-60’s, Sunset Strip garage pop, but it’s not entirely out anachronistic in 1968, considering the wide variety of pop/rock styles in play in LA, including creations by Brian Wilson, Curt Boettcher/Gary Usher and the cosmic, pre-Gram sounds of ‘Dr Byrds’ era McGuinn.
Placing the Primrose Circus in this context is a little problematic, as there are only the two sides of the 45 to go by, but I’m willing to make an educated guess, and will gladly correct myself if anyone out there has some solid information in another direction.
Interestingly enough, ‘PS Call Me Lulu’ saw release in the UK on the President label (home to the Equals, among others) a year later.
Either way, it’s a very groovy record, and I hope you dig it.
Peace
Larry

Example

PS Fall by Funky16Corners for some funky, pre-’War’ sounds

New Colony Six – Things I’d Like To Say

Example

The “early” New Colony Six

Example

Listen – Things I’d Like To Say – MP3

Greetings all.
I hope everyone has had a chance to dig the guest mix over at Fufu Stew.
Today’s selection is by a band that I consider to me one of the most interesting Chicago bands of the 60’s, the New Colony Six.
I don’t recall how I first heard their music (probably from a compilation of some sort) but during my peak garage/psyche days in the 80’s I managed to track down a number of their locally released 45s, as well as their later LPs on Mercury.
The group formed in 1964, and started their career with a much different sound than when they dissolved in the 70’s.
Their first big impact was the huge regional hit ‘I Confess’ in 1966. The early sides the NC6 recorded for Sentar/Centaur were US garage with a serious Brit R&Beat inflection, more Pretty Things than Beatles.
They had two LPs released (in 1966 and 1967) on Sentar, ‘Breakthrough’ and ‘Colonization’ before being signed (like many other Chicago area bands) to Mercury in 1968.
By that time their sound had evolved considerably, moving from their heavier roots, to lighter pop and eventually into sophisticated, Association style pop.
The first time I heard today’s selection ‘Things I’d Like To Say’ (which was by far their biggest hit, making the national Top 40 in late 1968/early 1969) I had no idea I was hearing the New Colony Six. It was only a few years later when I picked it up on a CD comp that I realized how much they had changed as a band in a few short years.
This had a lot to do with personnel changes. By the time they hit with ‘Things…’ brothers Craig and Wally Kemp had left the band, and vocalist Ronnie Rice (who co-wrote ‘Things.. and their other big hit of that period ‘I Will Always Think About You’) had joined.
The sound of ‘Things I’d Like To Say’ sees the NC6 dropping all pretentions to fuzz-hood, choosing instead a lighter, more urbane pop sound. The albums from this period ‘Revelations’ and ‘Attacking a Straw Man’ are both fairly easy to come by and definitely worth picking up.
I hope you dig the tune.
Peace
Larry

Example

PS Fall by Funky16Corners for a very interesting story

Iron Chef – Iron Leg

Example

Today’s Mystery Ingredient! RARE GROOVES!!!!

Greetings all.

I hope all is well on your end.

I’m kind of – but not quite – taking the day off (at least here) as I am answering the invitation of the mighty Soul Chef, Vincent, proprietor of Fufu Stew, to serve up a guest mix. Vincent has been running a series of such mixes (the most recent one, by DJ Bluewater is a stone groove), and he asked me to bring a hot dish to the table (it ought to be up over there by Monday morning).

What I’ve done is blended the Funky16Corners and Iron Leg vibes to cook up a mix that I call

‘Outta Sight: aka Mancini King of Monsters!’.

There’s a lot of Now Sound, many breaks (of course), some soul jazz and even a soupcon of disco, all masterfully seasoned, put briefly under the broiler and brought to your table sizzling and ready to eat.

So head on over to Fufu Stew, check out my mix, and make sure you stick around and sample Vincent’s excellent home brewed mixes.

I’ll be back on Wednesday with some more grooviness

Peace
Larry

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,352 other followers