Iron Leg Digital Trip #14 – Covered In Kitsch

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Playlist
Helmut Zacharias – Hurdy Gurdy Man (Capitol)
Four Freshmen – Hurdy Gurdy Man (Liberty)
Enoch Light – Sunshine Superman (Project 3)
Paul Horn – Eight Miles High (RCA)
David McCallum – Turn Turn Turn (Capitol)
Brooklyn Bridge – Nights In White Satin (Buddah)
Ronnie Aldrich – Ride My See Saw (London)
Bud Shank – Cocoanut Grove (World Pacific)
Artie Schroeck Implosion – Six O’Clock (Verve)
Duane Eddy – Monday Monday (Reprise)
Tony Hatch – Black Is Black (Warner Brothers)
Roger Coulam – Dizzy (Contour)
Enoch Light – Marrakesh Express (Project 3)

Listen/Download 55MB Mixed MP3

Download 36MB ZIP File-

Greetings all.
My vacation (from work, not from the interwebs) has come to an end and I come to you today with a sequel (tangential) of sorts to Iron Leg Digital Trip #5, The Party.
Where ‘The Party’ was focused on a very specific aesthetic, in which common ground was touched upon from a number of different musical perspectives, this version of the podcast focuses almost exclusively on kitsch. What we have here is 60’s pop and rock as viewed through the lens of (almost exclusively) non-rock musicians, many coming from the “easy” side of the tracks.
Like many Iron Leg and Funky16Corners mixes, this one was the result of inspirado, i.e. it fell together pretty spontaneously after I bagged a couple of unusual easy 45s during a recent dig. I took them home, started prowling through the crates and before long the playlist began to take shape.
When you’re dealing with this kind of stuff, there is definitely a thread of exploitation running through the mix, with the vast majority of these “interpretations” based in an often feeble grab at the pop market from someone operating on the outside.
The mix opens with a track by German violinist Helmut Zacharias. Almost completely unknown here in the states, he was an easy listening star on the Continent, recording countless albums filled with all kinds of pop and classical material. His version of Donovan’s ‘Hurdy Gurdy Man’, at first seems like a tragically ill-advised dip into psychedelic waters.
That is until the next track in which the very same tune is given a vocal interpretation by the Four Freshman.
You heard me right.
A few months back I was picking through a box of extremely unpromising LPs when I pulled out the Four Freshmen disc, flipped it over to see if there were any unusual covers and saw the track that you’re hearing now. I was working without a portable that day, but there was no way in hell that I wasn’t going to invest fifty cents to hear for myself how a staid, middle aged, brylcreemed gang like the Four Freshmen was going to attack ‘Hurdy Gurdy Man’. It’s every bit as weird and uncomfortable as you’d imagine, with a sort of Five Neat Guys (see SCTV) feel to it.
Next up with the Donovan is none other than Easy-Auteur Enoch Light. Light’s albums from the 60s and early 70s are a gold mine of really interesting versions of pop, rock and soul material, all arranged for maximum quadraphonic, HI FI headphone action and often actually worth listening to. His take on ‘Sunshine Superman’ has a Vic Mizzy-esque feel and wouldn’t have been out of place on the soundtrack to ‘The Love God’.
Paul Horn was a jazz flautist who would go on a few years later to be (like Tony Scott) one of the early proponents of the new age sound with his ‘Inside’ LP. In the mid-60s he was still a fairly mainstream jazz artist recording covers of rock material. His version of the Byrds ‘Eight Miles High’ brings with it a kind of intriguing squareness with it, including a far out clarinet solo.
David McCallum was of course Ilya Kuryakin on the hugely popular ‘Man from U.N.C.L.E.’. Why he felt he needed to release albums of easy listening orchestrations of pop material is a mystery. However, he did so with the assistance of both H.B. Barnum and beat diggers fave David Axelrod, and the LPs are sought after today by both devotees of easy/kitsch sounds and 60-year-old women reliving their teen crushes.
The next cut is from the folks that brought you ‘The Worst That Could Happen’. That’s right, Johnny Maestro and the Brooklyn Bridge. Their, ummm, ‘overwrought’ take on the Moody Blues ‘Nights In White Satin’ comes from their third LP, 1970s ‘Brooklyn Bridge’, which appears in retrospect to be a grab for relevance with the rock market, with a heavier sound and covers of Neil Young and the Buffalo Springfield.
That their efforts were for naught is put into sharp focus by the quality of the cover of ‘Ride My See Saw’ by British pianist Ronnie Aldrich. Aldrich was for a time the musical director of the BBC, and recorded a number of “easy” LPs with arrangements of pop material. His version of ‘Ride My See Saw’ is actually pretty cool in an ‘Avengers Theme’ kid of way.
Bud Shank was a serious jazz musician and proponent of the West Coast cool school who, like many of his contemporaries recorded albums of pop material to keep the money coming in. His 1967 LP ‘A Spoonful of Jazz’ was composed entirely of Lovin’ Spoonful covers and featured a who’s who of West Coast jazz and studio bigshots. His take on ‘Cocoanut Grove’ – which was fairly jazzy in its original version – is very cool.
Coming from yet another all-Spoonful-covers LP is ‘Six O’Clock’ by the Artie Schroeck Implosion (one of the first tunes featured on this blog). Schroeck was another one of the easy cats who took an imaginative approach to his arrangements, adding little psychedelic touches here and there.
Duane Eddy had a number of guitar instrumental hits, but by the middle of the 60s was hopelessly out of his depth in a sea of flower power. His 1967 LP ‘The Biggest Twang In Town’ (destined to be defaced by a generation of teenage wise guys) contained a number of pop and rock covers, with his take on the Mamas and Papas ‘Monday Monday’ being the most interesting.
Tony Hatch was a very successful pop songwriter (‘Downtown’) who recorded a couple of albums worth of instrumental arrangements of pop material, mostly covers, including a groovy version of Los Bravos ‘Black Is Black’.
Roger Coulam
was a studio organist in the UK and Europe (playing on many Serge Gainsbourg LPs) who recorded a number of his own LPs of instrumentals. His version of Tommy Roe’s ‘Dizzy’ comes from the LP ‘Hammond Stereo Sounds To Spoil You’.
This edition of the Iron Leg Digital Trip closes out with yet another cut from Enoch Light. His version of Crosby Stills & Nash’s ‘Marrakesh Express’ is heavy on the moog and the horns and the background singers, and a fitting conclusion for our little foray into the swinging sounds of squaresville.

Peace
Larry
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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for a couple of Steely Dan covers.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too…

Fleetwood Mac – Albatross

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OG Fleetwood Mac

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Listen – Fleetwood Mac – Albatross – MP3

Greetings all.
I hope the day finds you well. My brain is – as is almost always the case – battered, tattered and throwing sparks. As a result I’ve decided to pull a gem from the UK rock crates guaranteed to put even the most savage breast (look it up…) to rights.

I’d also like to take a moment to let you know that Funky16Corners has jut passed the 1,000,000 hit mark and I’m celebrating with the fourth podcast composed entirely of Beatle covers (soul, funk, jazz etc). Check it out if you get the chance.
If – like me – you came of age in the 70s, the name Fleetwood Mac is sure to conjure up all kinds of memories, but mostly the kind that prominently feature Stevie Nicks and Lindsay Buckingham. It wasn’t until I picked up my first John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers LP that I realized that the history of Fleetwood Mac was a much deeper thing than I had assumed (but then most things are…).
That realization came with seeing the name (and face) of John McVie on the sleeve.
It was in 1967 that McVie, along with fellow Bluesbreakers, guitarist Peter Green and drummer Mick Fleetwood jumped ship to form Fleetwood Mac.
Along with Jeremy Spencer they recorded three, mainly blues LPs for the Blue Horizon label. Teenage guitarist Danny Kirwan joined the band in 1968 and the sound of the band started to change. Green and Kirwan started to move the group away from a blues revival/purist sound to a more expansive, vaguely psychedelic sound.
I’ve always felt Fleetwood Mac mk2 (after Kirwan joined but before Green left) suffered from a mild case of musical schizophrenia, with the progressive faction (led by Green) doing battle with Jeremy Spencer, who always sounded as if he’d have been pleased to sit in a pub playing Elmore James tunes all day long. The record that signaled the changing course of the band (in a BIG way) was 1969s ‘Albatross’. The mellow, reflective instrumental was a Number One hit in the UK (and Top 10 on the Continent). If ‘Albatross’ sounds eerily familiar, consider the fact that it has been long rumored to have been the inspiration for the Beatles ‘Sun King’ (it sure sounds like it to me).
The feel of ‘Albatross’ is echoed in the sound of the group’s next album (my personal fave) ‘Then Play On’, which saw them mixing hard edged rock (‘Oh Well’, ‘Rattlesnake Shake’) with gentler, hippy friendly material like ‘My Dream’ and ‘Although the Sun Is Shining’ (both written by Kirwan).
Peter Green’s tenure in the band – as his growing status as one of the original UK 60s guitar gods – came to an end by the Spring of 1970, at which time he had a breakdown of sorts and dropped out of the music business entirely (except for a brief return to the band in 1971 when Spencer bailed out to join a cult).
Later in 1971, both Christine Perfect (later to marry John McVie) and Bob Welch would join the band, taking it in yet another direction, with the Buckingham/Nicks era still four years off.
I hope you dig the tune.
Peace
Larry

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PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a new edition of Funky16Corners Radio (all Beatles covers).

PSS Paperback Rider has just been updated…

Small Faces – All or Nothing

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Small Faces – Steve Marriot, Kenney Jones, Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan

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Listen – Small Faces – All or Nothing – MP3

Greetings all.
The tune I bring you today has been a serious favorite of mine since the first time I heard it over 20 years ago.
Though I was a major Beatle-nut as a kid, it wasn’t until my involvement with the garage/mod revival in the mid-80s that I was introduced to the R&B/mod side of the Beat boom. The toughest of all the bands, and perhaps the truest “mods” in the lot were the mighty Small Faces.
I was certainly acquainted with the Kinks and the Who (both of whom went on to be huge during the classic rock FM radio years of my teens), that the Small Faces were known to me at all was by virtue of the fact that they went on to form Humble Pie (a band my high school pals and I were rather fond of) and the Faces.
Needless to say, I had a lot to learn, because as much as I still like both of those bands today, neither one of them can hold a candle to the Small Faces.
Formed in London in 1965 by Steve Marriott (guitar/vocals, who’d been a child actor), Ronnie Lane (bass guitar), Kenney Jones (drums) and Jimmy Winston (organ). The group had their first hit that year with ‘Whatcha Gonna Do About It’ (Top 20 in the UK). The Small Faces absorbed (and reflected in their sound) more of a soul/R&B influence than any of their contemporaries*.
Winston was replaced later in 1965 by Ian McLagan and would go on to record one of the truly great freakbeat 45s (‘Real Crazy Apartment’) as the leader of Winston’s Fumbs.
The Small Faces went on to have a number of UK chart hits, and ‘All or Nothing’ was their biggest, hitting Number One in 1966.
The tune is one of the great lost love/break up songs but eschews maudlin sentiment, choosing instead to be an anthem of defiance. The first time I heard ‘All or Nothing’ was not on a record but rather via a bootleg video of the Small Faces performing the song live on German TV. I absolutely fell in love with the song and still see it today as the peak of the band’s Decca years (which would end shortly with their move to Immediate).
If you’re not familiar with the band’s early years you need to grab one of the reissues of their Decca recordings, which are a revelation. They were truly one of the toughest bands of their time and the bigger stateside hits of their contemporaries, along with the success of the Small Faces’ later bands have conspired to keep their first recordings hidden from a lot of people.
I hope you dig the tune.
Peace
Larry

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*I would include the Action in that equation

**If anyone has a copy of ‘Real Crazy Apartment’ that they want to part with, drop me a line.

PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a remembrance of New Orleans singer Chuck Carbo.

PSS Paperback Rider has just been updated…

Cher – There But For Fortune

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Sonny & Cher

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Listen – Cher – There But for Fortune – MP3

Greetings all.
During the period in the 80s when I was deeply immersed in 60s sounds and iconography, there wasn’t (at least for me) a stringer symbol of the mid-60s Sunset Strip than Sonny & Cher. I still have an old postcard of the duo in their early prime, Sonny in his fur vest, Cher with her beatnik girl hair, hip huggers and Cleopatra eye makeup, one glance of which is enough to send you to Pandoras Box.
Though there are those that would dispute their musical validity – I used to be one of them – their Lps, as well as Cher’s early solo albums are a storehouse of late-period imitation Wall of Sound-isms, Sonny having studied at the tiny little feet of the master himself.
That said, while Cher’s albums are often weighted down by ill advised versions of standards (but then so were any number of Motown LPs), there is almost always something cool waiting their for those willing to take the time to look.
During a recent fleamarket dig I grabbed a bunch of cheap, dusty, sunburned vinyl (nothing more than a dollar). One of the LPs I brought home was Cher’s 1968 LP ‘With Love, Cher’. I grabbed it because it included a version of ‘Hey Joe’ – which was pretty cool – but the tune that really hit me was her cover of Phil Ochs’ ‘There But For Fortune’.
Oddly enough, the first version I ever heard of this song was a quiet, pretty cover by Francoise Hardy (Cher-like in her own Gallic way). Though I was familiar with Ochs, and owned a couple of his albums, I’d never heard this song.
As I said earlier, thanks to Sonny’s (and Cher’s) time with Phil Spector, there are many Sonny & Cher recordings that bear the mark of the Wall of Sound. An extra added bonus is the fact that their musical director was none other than New Orleans expatriate, Harold Battiste who brought many Crescent City players, like Earl Palmer, Alvin Robinson, Jesse Hill and Mac Rebennack out West. It has long been rumored that the first ‘Dr. John’ LP was recorded during leftover Sonny & Cher studio time.
‘There But for Fortune’ is a great showcase for Cher’s voice – not always my favorite, but outstanding when showcased properly, a la her version of ‘Alfie’ that runs over the end credits of the film of the same name – as well as a nicely layered arrangement.
I hope you dig the tune, and I’ll be back soon with more.
Peace
Larry

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PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a new jazz funk mix!

PSS Paperback Rider has just been updated…

Super Set

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The Super Set

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Listen – Super Set (Keith Allison, Gene Clark, Freak Scene) Side 1- MP3

Greetings all.
The “side “ I bring you today is quite literally a full side of an EP.
During a recent record show dig, while prowling through the crates of a dealer from whom I’ve been buying garage and psych for more than 20 years, the name Gene Clark caught my eye. I’m a huge fan of Clark’s post-Byrds solo work – especially the ‘Gene Clark with the Gosdin Brothers’ LP – so when I saw a small picture of that very album on a sleeve, I pulled it out of the box.
What I thought I had – at the time – was a six-song promo EP of Columbia releases by Clark, Keith Allison, the Freak Scene, the Peanut Butter Conspiracy, Chris Farlowe and Brute Force. As it was late in the day and I was beat – and the record was only ten bucks – I grabbed it without unholstering the portable.
When I got home and slipped the record on the turntable I discovered that what I had purchased was a radio-station promo that included only truncated versions of the songs, interspersed with some of the craziest, Real Don Steele-ish AM DJ psycho-patter that I’ve ever heard (PA-SIKE-O-DELIC PA-SOUL!!!). I also discovered that there was a sheet of photos in the sleeve that I missed when I checked the condition of the record.
That said, I think you’ll find – as I did – that it’s a great little time capsule of a bygone era. If anyone knows who the DJ is please drop me a line.
Now to start searching for that Gene Clark OG….
Peace
Larry

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PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for some Memphis soul from a surprising source!

PSS Stop by Paperback Rider too…

The Electric Flag – Grooving Is Easy

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The Electric Flag

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Listen – The Electric Flag – Grooving Is Easy – MP3

Greetings all.
Today’s selection is a tune that I only discovered in the last year or so.
Though I was certainly aware of the Electric Flag since I was a kid, via all manner of rock lit and 99 cent cut out bin litter, the band never really grabbed my interest.
It was only upon the death of Buddy Miles – who I knew mainly as a member of Band of Gypsys – that I decided to seek out and listen to the sounds of the short-lived Electric Flag.
I suppose one of the reasons I never really dug into the EF was the Mike Bloomfield association. As an avid reader of rock history and criticism since my early teenage years Bloomfield was one of those guys that seemed to have gotten a tremendous amount of shine in his day, looked upon as a wunderkind of sorts via his time in the Butterfield Blues Band as a solo, sideman (Super Session) and then as founder of the Electric Flag. Though Bloomfield’s heart was clearly in the right place, and he was a more than able guitarist he stands as an example of white critics deification of white “bluesmen” (quotes added as a pejorative indicator) in near total ignorance of the players they worshipped and copied. I wouldn’t go as far as to blame this on Bloomfield, or Clapton or Peter Green, but as a segment of rock criticism it died a justifiable death a long time ago. It didn’t take much digging to realize that for every Clapton or Bloomfield there were tons of Hubert Sumlins, Albert (and Freddy) Kings, Otis Rushs and Buddy Guys.
That said, this particular argument isn’t one hundred percent relevant when discussing the Electric Flag. Though a portion of their repertoire was recycled blues, Bloomfield’s intention on forming the band was to embrace what he called “American Music’, with the blues, jazz, soul and R&B mixed together with the added power of a horn section.
The first full length LP by the Electric Flag, 1968s ‘Long Time Comin’’ (preceded by contributions to the soundtrack to ‘The Trip’) was a mixed bag of grooving blues, R&B and soulful pop. My favorite track is today’s selection, ‘Groovin’ Is Easy’, written by singer/guitarist Nick Gravenites. Gravenites had written for the Butterfield Blues Band and went on to work with Janis Joplin and Quicksilver Messenger Service among others. He’s still grooving and can be found (along with lots of music, including live sets) at www.nickgravenites.com .
‘Groovin’ Is Easy’ is a great example of the perfect intersection of often incongruous sounds/vibes that happened so often in the 60s. The music world was a fertile crucible where artistic collisions that might look like a disaster on paper sometime produced magical results. ‘Groovin’ Is Easy’ is one of those.
Opening with a majestic fanfare, the tune has a soulful underpinning but the driving force is one of mid-60’s sunshine. It’s the kind of pop-inflected record a blues band never would have made a few years before or after, but in 1967/68, it was just what the doctor ordered.
I hope you dig it and I’ll see you all on Monday.
Peace
Larry

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PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for another great funk 45!

PSS Stop by Paperback Rider too…

The Thoughts – All Night Stand

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Peter Beckett of the Thoughts

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Listen – The Thoughts – All Night Stand – MP3

Greetings all.
I hope all is well on your end, and that you’ve got room in your ears for a rare piece of UK vinyl.
A few weeks ago, when I featured the Creation’s ‘Making Time’ I mentioned that I would soon profile the Thoughts, so here you have it.
I first heard this tune – like so many others from the period – via a mix tape created by my old pal and all-around Modfather Bill Luther, the authority for all things British for our little revivalist circle in the 80’s.
Back then, the appeal – aside from the fact that this is a very groovy record indeed – was that the tune in question ‘All Night Stand’ by the Thoughts was a song that had been written by Ray Davies and demoed for, but never recorded by the Kinks.
It was another one of those records that I figured I’d never find, so imagine my shock when I picked up a pile off rare garage/beat 45s out of a (rather pricey) box at a recent record show, only to notice that snappy Planet Records logo peeking out at me. That surprise was amplified when I scanned further down the label and realized that I was holding that very Thoughts 45. Though the price on the disc was a little dear for my bankroll at the time (though not generally as I would have expected it to be selling for more) I went ahead, made a command decision and gave it a home in my crates.
Good thing I did (for me and you all) because it’s a great record.
The Thoughts started out as the backing band for a singer named Tiffany (NO, not THAT Tiffany…) and recorded a few 45s in that capacity. They first recorded as the Thoughts in 1966, when they waxed ‘All Night Stand’ for Planet (there’s apparently a difference between the US and UK versions, this being the former).
Davies had written the tune for a proposed film of the same name, which was never made (thought the Thoughts made an appearance in a film called ‘Girls In Short Dresses’).
The vocalist on ‘All Night Stand’ – making his recording debut, was a Liverpudlian named Peter Beckett. Beckett eventually moved on from the Thoughts to join the groups Winston G and the Wicked, the Whip and eventually, for a short time the World of Oz (big run of “W” bands there…). He recorded two albums with the group Paladin, before relocating to the US in 1974.
This is of course where the story takes an unexpected turn.
Sometime between then and 1977, Beckett co-founded the band Player, for whom he wrote and sang the 1978 Number One hit ‘Baby Come Back’ (come on…who among you saw that coming???). This of course proves once again the first law of Iron Leg, even the biggest hunks of AM radio cheese have interesting roots (seen also over at Funky16Corners).
I hope you dig the tune.
Peace
Larry

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PS Make sure to stop by Funky16Corners for a new edition of Funky16Corners Radio featuring Meters covers!

PSS Stop by Paperback Rider too…

Iron Leg Digital Trip v.13 – Anniversary Mix Pt2

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Ed ‘Big Daddy’ Roth RIP.

Playlist
Bob Seger & the Last Heard – East Side Story (Cameo)
Boo Boo & Bunky – This Old Town (Brent)
Darelycks – Bad Trip (Fine)
Lindy Blaskey & the Lavells – Let It Be (Space)
Sonics – Maintaining My Cool (Jerden) 1966
Starlites – I Can’t See You (Barclay)
Mystery Bonus Track
Kit & The Outlaws – Don’t Tread On Me (Black Knight)
Springfield Rifle – 100 or Two (Jerden)
Terry Knight & the Pack – Numbers (Lucky Eleven)
Mouse & the Traps – Beg Borrow and Steal (Fraternity)
Bob Seger System – Down Home (Capitol)

Listen/Download 36MB Mixed MP3

Download 25MB ZIP File-

Greetings all.
I hope you’ve all (or at least some of you) been digging part one of the Anniversary mix. The allotted two days have passed and it’s time for part two in which the loop is closed, the cipher completed and the fuzz shredded just a little bit more.
Things get off to a blazing start with – once again – another longtime personal fave, ‘East Side Story’ by Bob Seger & the Last Heard. This was a HUGE hit in Michigan, so much so that it was picked up for national released on Cameo, and generated covers in California (Caretakers) and the UK (St. Louis Union). ‘East Side Story’ moves along on a locomotive fueled by equal parts ‘Gloria’ and ‘I Can Only Give You Everything’, led by Seger’s leather-lunged wail. Unlike many garage 45s, this one has a slightly more complicated rhythmic thrust (check the way the bongos roll underneath and carry the beat out of the chorus each time). Killer.
Next up is another one from the suburbs of California, the wailing ‘This Old Town’ by the oddly named duo of Boo Boo and Bunky. This is a great example of garage punk taking root in the fertile influence of the British R&B sound during 1965. Check out that wailing harmonica over the pounding guitars.
The next track is one of my great bargain finds, having picked it up in the basement of a New York City record store for a shiny quarter dollar. ‘Bad Trip’ by the Darelycks is a 1966 lo-fi gem out of the Fine recording studio in Rochester, NY. The Fine label also released some other rare garage and soul.
We return to the flipside of the Lindy Blaskey & the Lavells 45 with the manic ‘Let It Be’. Fueled by some low rent combo organ and a wailing harmonica, this complements ‘You Ain’t Tuff’ very nicely making for an excellent two-sider.
Speaking of two-siders, they don’t get much heavier or more deadly than the Sonics 1966 ‘Psycho’ b/w ‘Maintaining My Cool’. While the a-side will appear by itself in the not too distant future, the b-side is in my opinion the finest thing the monsters from the Northwest did during their later years. ‘Maintaining My Cool’ marries a heavily reverbed rhythm guitar crunch with a certain inebriated yet menacing party vibe that sounds like a frat kegger on the verge of turning into a riot. God bless the Sonics.
We head clear across the country for an absolutely brilliant example of Pennsylvania garage by the Starlites. I wish I could say that I owned an OG of this killer, but the comp from which it comes (‘Psychedelic Disaster Whirl’) is fairly rare in its own right, so take that for what it’s worth. I’ve seen this dated to 1965, which if true makes this a remarkable prescient bit of punkery.
The mystery bonus track in this mix is perhaps the greatest garage punk tune never issued on vinyl (and also played by skeletons).
I couldn’t very well put a mix like this together without including some deadly Texas punk, and there are a couple of winners this time out. The first is yet another local punk 45 that gained enough local popularity that it was picked up for national issue. Kit and the Outlaws iconic ‘Don’t Tread On Me’ first saw the light of day on the local Dallas, TX label Black Knight (the one I have) before being reissued by Philips. If I had to pick one 45 that is really the archetypal sixties garage punk 45, this would be the one.
The Springfield Rifle represented the lighter side of the Jerden label. They released over a dozen 45s (on Jerden, Burdette and ABC) as well as an LP on Burdette. The group’s first 45, ‘100 or Two’ with its French horn flourishes balanced against fuzz guitar and harmony vocals is a cool example of the more progressive end of the garage spectrum.
Terry Knight and the Pack were one of the more popular bands out of the Detroit area, glancing the national charts a few times. They are best remembered today for being the band from which Mark Farner and Don Brewer went on to form Grand Funk Railroad. ‘Numbers’ has a wild, repeated fuzz guitar riff, pounding drums and a snotty vocal by Knight. I really dig the Yardbirds-style rave up toward the end of the record.
‘Beg Borrow and Steal’ is another one of those tracks that I knew for years in a modern version (by the Plimsouls) , which I had no idea was a cover (of an original by Mouse and the Traps). Hailing – like Murphy and the Mob – from Tyler, TX, Mouse and the Traps, led by singer Ronnie Weiss had a minor hit with the tune ‘Public Execution’ and went on to record a number of outstanding garage punk 45s including ‘Maid of Sugar’, ‘I Satisfy’ and of course ‘Beg Borrow and Steal’. I love the guitar/organ riff in this one, the faux sitar noodling and Weiss’s repeated screams of “AWWWRIGHT!!”.
This second half of the Iron Leg anniversary mix comes to a close with a tune that comes outside of the traditionally accepted garage punk timeline, yet manages to pack a wallop (and a whole lot of attitude). ‘Appearing on the Bob Seger System LP ‘Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man’, ‘Down Home’ has a cool guitar riff, some wailing harmonica and a bizarre lyric involving someone kicking a hippy in the head with hobnail boots (ouch!).If that ain’t punk brother, I don’t know what is.
That said, I hope you dig the mix, and I’ll be back next week with some more goodness.

Peace
Larry
Example

PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some North Carolina funk.

PSS Paperback Rider was just updated on Saturday…

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