Iron Leg Digital Trip #32 – A Not Unpleasing Splash of Colour

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Iron Leg Digital Trip #32 – A Not Unpleasing Splash of Colour

Playlist
Keith Mansfield – Soul Thing (Pronit)
101 Strings – Jesus Christ Superstar (edit) (Alshire)
Jimmy Smith – The Cat (45 edit) (Verve)
Enoch Light – C’Mon and Swim (Command)
Living Strings – Out and About (Camden)
Mariano and the Unbelievables – Sunshine Superman (Capitol)
Lady Nelson and the Lords – Soho Strut (Dunhill)
Louis Bellson – The Eel (Project 3)
Quincy Jones – Mohair Sam (Mercury)
Lloyd Green – Steel Blue (Chart)
Mike Sharpe – Spook A Lou (Liberty)
Dave Pike Set – You’ve Got the Feeling (Wagram)
Vic Mizzy – Daybreak In Malibu (MGM)
Andre Brasseur – Pow Pow (MFP)
Virtues – Meditation of the Soul (Andee)
Enoch Light – Bond Street (Project 3)
New London Rhythm and Blues Band – Soul Mate (Vocalion)
Freddie Scott and the Seven Steps – It’s Not Unusual (Marlin)
101 Strings – Spinning Wheel (Alshire)
Mohawks – Baby Hold On Pt2 (Cotillion)
Moe Koffman – Funky Monkey (Jubilee)
US Air Force Academy Falconaires – Day Tripper (USAFA)
Keith Mansfield – Funky Fanfare (KPM)

Listen/Download 102MB/256K Mixed Mp3

Download 77MB Zip File

Greetings all.
I hope you’re all well and ready to soak up some prime au-go-go flavour.
I’m heading off for some hard earned rest and relaxation, so I figured I should whip up a tasty mix for your delectation while I’m on the road.
Today’s mix, Iron Leg Digital Trip #32 – A Not Unpleasant Splash of Colour is in many ways a sequel to ILDT#5 The Party.
As is explained at length in the post that accompanied that mix, in assembling those songs (and the tunes in this collection) I was attempting to capture a specific vibe, redolent of a kind of ‘Playboy After Dark’, crushed velvet, puffy sleeves, bell bottoms, frugging and the like.
I’d always intended on doing a second mix long those lines, but the idea remained dormant until the recent acquisition of an exceptional album that stood as the perfect representation of the aforementioned feeling.
This mix has a slightly different tinge to it, with a number of records that would not be out of place over at Funky16Corners, bringing a touch of high energy soul jazz, blazing Hammond and a breakbeat or two into the recipe.
There are a couple of repeat appearance by artists from ‘The Party’, but I think that once you give the mix a listen, you’ll agree that their inclusion was a foregone conclusion.
Things get off to rousing start with Keith Mansfield’s original version of ‘Soul Thing’. This tune is one of the more interesting numbers from the library music master’s oeuvre, with a theme that was rerecorded (and renamed) several times, by Mansfield himself, his collaborator Alan Hawkshaw, Tony Newman (see the version of ‘Soul Thing’ from the earlier mix), vocal versions (under the title ‘House of Jack’) by the Establishment (in the US) and James Royal (in the UK) as well as the psychedelic treatment by Arzachel (Queen Street Gang). This version, from the ‘All You Need Is Keith Mansfield’ LP is special because not only does it feature Mansfield’s piano (as opposed to the Hammond) but it opens with an exceptionally crisp break.
Next up is a brief, but fuzz filled excerpt from the 101 Strings version of the main theme from ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’.
Exploding from your speakers comes the mighty Jimmy Smith with ‘The Cat’. Written by none other than Lalo Schifrin for the Alain Delon feature ‘The Joy House’. It’s one of the truly great Hammond 45s of the 60s and moves along like a runaway freight train.
Those that follow the “easy” side of things at Iron Leg will be well acquainted with the sounds of Enoch Light. Oddly enough I first heard is blazing version of Bobby Freeman’s ‘C’Mon and Swim’ when someone at a DJ night found Light’s ‘Discotheque’ LP behind the bar and played it as a goof. Good thing too since it’s a dance floor mover.
The Living Strings arrive with a fantastic, fuzzed out take on Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart’s ‘Out and About’, which sounds like it was lifted from a discotheque scene in a mid-60s TV show.
Mariano and the Unbelievables appeared in this space recently with a cover of Young-Holt’s ‘Wack Wack’. Their take on Donovan’s oft-covered (there must be hundreds) ‘Sunshine Superman’ is a little more on the laid back tip, but exceedingly groovy nonetheless.
Lady Nelson and the Lords are something of an oddball find from my frantic early days as a Hammond nut. Portia Nelson was best known as an actress on Broadway and in the movies (she’s in ‘Dr. Doolittle’). I have no idea how she ended up recording an entire album of Vox organ features, but the enterprise is not without its charms. There are a couple of cool covers on the LP, but the number featured here is an original entitled ‘Soho Strut’.
Coming under the Enoch Light umbrella is legendary drummer Louis Bellson’s swinging ‘The Eel’, recorded for Light’s Project 3 label.
Speaking of legends, can you dig something by Quincy Jones? His version of Charlie Rich’s (and Slim Harpo’s) ‘Mohair Sam’ features a band including none other than Ray Charles on the organ.
The real wild card in this set is ‘Steel Blue’ by Lloyd Green. Green was a busy Nashville session musician, playing steel guitar on countless albums, country and otherwise. ‘Steel Blue’ is something of an aberration in his catalog, mixing wailing pedal steel with electric sitar and a go-go beat.
Mike Sharpe – who co-wrote and recorded the original version of ‘Spooky’ – chimes in with the wild ‘Spook A Lou’ which features him on the sax.
Vibraphonist Dave Pike got his start playing Latin-tinged soul jazz, but found his was to the swinging side of things by the time he recorded his cover of James Brown’s ‘(I’ve)Got the Feelin’ in 1969.
Vic Mizzy wrote some of the finest – and quirkiest – soundtrack music of the 1960s for TV (the Addams Family) and the movies (several Don Knotts vehicles). ‘Daybreak In Malibu’ is from the soundtrack of the Tony Curtis feature ‘Don’t Make Waves’.
Belgian organist Andre Brasseur’s ‘Pow Pow’ appeared in this space as a single track, but it’s so mod, so groovy, so wild that I had to include it in this mix.
Philadelphia’s Virtues recorded a number of instrumental 45s from the late 50s onward. Led by guitarist, producer and studio owner Frank Virtue, they recorded the funky sitar number ‘Meditation of the Soul’ for the local Andee label.
Enoch Light is back again with his insanely produced (slap on some headphones and check out the wild stereo separation) version of Burt Bacharach’s ‘Bond Street’ from the soundtrack to ‘Casino Royale’. If there’s a single piece of music that can be considered to have inspired the whole, unfortunate ‘Austin Powers’ thing, this is it.
As I’ve state before, I have my suspicions that the organist on the New London Rhythm and Blues Band LP sounds (at least to me) like the mighty man behind the Mohawks, Alan Hawkshaw. I’ve never been able to confirm this (or anything else about the group) but ‘Soul Mate’ is more proof that you need to find yourself a copy of their album.
Miami soul/funk legend Freddy Scott recorded several excellent 45s in the 60s with a number of group configurations. The smoking Hammond cover of Tom Jones’ ‘It’s Not Unusual’ was recorded with the Seven Steps.
The 101 Strings were a product of the cheapo exploito label Alshire Records. I’d love to know who the brains were behind their insane, phased out version of Blood Sweat and Tears’ ‘Spinning Wheel’.
Speaking of Alan Hawkshaw and the Mohawks, here they come with the amazing ‘Baby Hold On Pt2’, one of the two Mohawks 45s to be released in the US.
Canadian flute player Moe Kauffman is another cat who got his start playing fairly straight-ahead jazz. By the late 60s he was all Nehru jacket and pointy booted, wailing on the electrified flute and sax, recording a number of groovy albums for Jubilee and Buddah. ‘Funky Monkey’ is a killer.
We head to Colorado and the United States Air Force Academy for a Beatles cover by the USAFA Falconaires band. The gatefold to their album includes a blurb by Dick Clark, and a mention of the group having had their own syndicated radio show.
This edition of the Iron Leg Digital Trip closes out with another one of the aforementioned iterations of Keith Mansfield’s ‘Soul Thing’, retitled ‘Funky Fanfare’. Mansfield and Alan Hawkshaw re-did the tune a few times for the UK library music label KPM, twice as ‘Funky Fanfare’ (once with a big band and the small group version heard here) and a number of variations on the them under other titles.
I hope you dig the mix, and let it rip the next time you fire up the lava lamp and mix up a shaker full of Zombies.
See you next week.

Peace
Larry


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PS Make sure to head over to Funky16Corners for a jazz funk mix.

PSS Check out Paperback Rider too…

Wool – The Boy With the Green Eyes

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Wool

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Listen – Wool – The Boy With the Green Eyes – MP3

Greetings all.

The end of the week is here at last, and I am one tired summamabitch.
In addition to the regular life stuff, appointments, chores and what not, I’ve been working on four hours woth of new mixes, one each for Iron Leg and Funky16Corners (since I’ll be on vacation next week) and a two hour radio show that will be hitting the air in April.
The tune I bring you today was a recent acquisition, a random record show find that I grabbed because it included an interesting cover version.
I won’t be bringing you that particular song today (I’m saving it for another mix) but rather the most excellent flip side of that song.
The group is Wool, the song, ‘The Boy With the Green Eyes’.
Wool (led by Ed and Claudia Wool) were a Syracuse, NY based band that recorded a number of 45s (for RCA, ABC and Columbia) and one full length album between 1966 and 1971. The tune I bring you today, ‘The Boy With the Green Eyes’ was written by Neil Diamond, and is actually a cover of an obscure 1968 single by a very late, very different version of the Angels, famous for ‘My Boyfriend’s Back’.
The Wool version of the tune is a nice bit of psyche pop, with some great, freakbeat-y guitar and tight drums, as well as nice harmony vocals. If you get a chance to hear the Angels’ original (which I’ll post in the future), it sounds a lot more like a Neil Diamond song of the period, sounding as if the arrangement was lifted directly from one of Diamonds publishing demos. Wool do a much grittier take on the song, plus they get extra credit for the album cover with the electrified sheep (that might have made a great group name too).
I hope you dig the tune, and I’ll be back on Monday (posting from the road) with an extra groovy new mix.
Have a great weekend.


Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soulful reggae.

PSS The Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive has been updated, now with 31 mixes!

Tony Orlando – To Wait For Love

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A Young – Moustache-free – Tony Orlando

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Listen/Download – Tony Orlando – To Wait For Love

Greetings all.

I come to you fresh from a successful vinyl excavation expedition, in which the haul was as much Iron Leggy as it was Funky16Corners-eque, i.e. lots of pop and rock goodies that will be dropping in this space in the coming months.
Be forwarned: the tune I bring you today is a slice of sophisticated, elegant pop music, perhaps too lush (and syrupy) for many of you.
However, since I love it, I’m going to go ahead and try your patience by writing about in anyway.
Bear with me, if you will.
Many years ago, via a friend in ‘the biz’, my brother got his hands on a promo-only Burt Bacharach box set (which eventually saw public issue) that was nothing less than a revelation.
I’ve been a huge Bacharach fan since repeated childhood exposure to the ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’ soundtrack. Oddly enough, from almost the very beginning, it wasn’t Bacharach’s songs that appealed to me (though they did) as it was his instrumental music. I can safely say that after the first 100 hearings, I never needed to hear ‘Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head’ again, but I can still remember selections from that soundtrack, like ‘South American Getaway’ and ‘The Old Fun City’ and how they introduced me to (nay drilled directly into my brain) Burt Bacharach’s sonic vocabulary.
He was a hook master like no other with a diamond cutters knack for inserting a sublime turn of musical phrase into a song at precisely the right moment. Listening to one of his compositions is like watching a brilliant race car driver, making all the correct turns and subtle adjustments while navigating a course, leaving all others in his dust.
Over the (many) years since then I’ve made it a point to grab and listen (frequently) his soundtrack work from movies like ‘What’s New Pussycat’ and ‘Casino Royale’ and smaller, incidental pieces like ‘Hasbrook Heights’, ‘Pacific Coast Highway’ and ‘Nikki’ (which I remember as the ABC Movie of the Week Theme from my childhood). Simply said, Bacharach was a genius. The music he created (on his own and with lyricist) Hal David is nothing less than the perfect embodiment of the 60s pop sensibility. It was hugely influential – stylistically and via countless reinterpretations of the material – and remains so today.
That said, the tune I bring you today is one that I first heard on that boxed set, and that I chased for years before securing my own (vinyl) copy.
Aside from the fact that ‘To Wait For Love’ is a beautiful song, it comes to you courtesy of the largely unheralded early work of one Tony Orlando.
Known to most via his hits with Dawn in the 70s, Orlando spent the 60s alternating between nascent pop-idolhood and working in the background of the music publishing business.
His early recordings for the Epic label, spanning the period of 1961 to 1964, ran the gamut from teen-ish pop, to sophisticated outings like today’s selection (his final 45 for the label). Interestingly, both sides of this 45 were Bacharach/David compositions, neither of which (as far as I can tell) was ever recorded by anyone else.
‘To Wait For Love’ is vintage Bacharach/David, filled with brilliant hooks. The arrangement by Garry Sherman is wonderful, with shimmering guitar running just under romantic accordion (no, seriously) flourishes. Orlando’s vocal proves that with the right combination of material and breaks he might have become a star much sooner than he did.
I just love this record.
I promise I’ll be back with something a little tougher later in the week.


Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for a tasty funk 45.

PSS The Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive has been updated, now with 31 mixes!

Alex Chilton RIP

Damn…

I just got word that the mighty Alex Chilton, of the Box Tops, Big Star and decades of solo work has passed away at the age of 59.

As has been discussed here before, when I was coming up in the 80s, the “big two” acts that seemed to influence everybody, and got played constantly in my car and my home, were the Velvet Underground and Big Star. The first two Big Star albums are among the finest recorded in the 70s, packed to the rafters with amazing songs and performances.

I’ll assume that most of the people that read this blog are already aware of their music. If your not, make it your business to check it out as soon as possible. You will not regret it.

The post below first appeared in October of 2008.

Peace

Larry

PS Check out the Box Tops on Zacherley’s Dance Party. Shades of Count Floyd…

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Radio City-era Big Star

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Listen – Big Star – O My Soul – MP3

Greetings all.
As is often the case in my little corner of the blog-o-mosphere, the tunes I select for inclusion therein are often picked at random, the result of yet another safari into the crates. I’ve discussed the phenomenon before, but so vast is the selection of vinyl piled in my lair, that I often find things I’d forgotten, or forsaken having assumed that they were forever lost.
The tune I bring you today was just such a record.
But first, a nostalgic interlude…
Back in the day, when my brothers* (blood and otherwise) were being inundated with sounds alternative (back when that really meant something), there were a few bands from the days of yore that were for youngsters like ourselves (and many before us) cornerstones of an even earlier alternative.
This list included such rediscoveries as the Sonics and the 13th Floor Elevators (on the garage/psyche tip) and most prominently (on a much larger scale), and most importantly to the formation of my own musical worldview, the Velvet Underground and Big Star.
Now, the Velvets had – thanks to the long and successful career of Lou Reed – a foot placed firmly in the present. I forget who said that everyone who bought a Velvets LP in the 60s went on to form a band, but that particular equation was multiplied exponentially in the 80s where no band from the 60s loomed larger.
Big Star was another story entirely.
Though Alex Chilton was something of an indie darling, no one sane would describe his post-Box Tops career as having seen any financial success. That said, in the 1980s the ears of anyone with even the tiniest bit of pop sensibility were filled with the music Chilton created with Big Star.
Formed in 1971 by Chris Bell, Andy Hummell, Steve Ray and Jody Stephens. Ray soon left the band and was replaced by Chilton. They were signed to the Stax Records subsidiary Ardent, and released their first album, ‘#1 Record’ in 1972.
If you haven’t heard ‘#1 Record’, back away from the interwebs (or open a new browser) and find yourself a copy, because – and you can trust me on this – it is one of the finest pop records ever recorded, by anyone, anywhere. That record, in which all but one of the songs were collaborations between Chilton and Bell (rife with Lennon/McCartney-esque creative tension) was the only one recorded by that line up.
By the time they released their follow up ‘Radio City’ in 1973, Bell had departed, along with a certain amount of their polish, which as we shall see, was a good thing, because that albums spontaneous feel was something of a shot heard round the world (with about a ten year delay) appearing a decade on in the sounds of REM and the Replacements among others.
Today’s selection is the only OG Big Star record I’ve ever come across in the field, and if memory serves was scooped up for chump change in an old record store.
‘O My Soul’ opens with wild, shambolic rhythm guitar, laced with bits of keyboard stabbing through the somewhat awkward beat. Chilton’s vocal is spot on (though if all you’ve ever heard him sing was ‘The Letter’, you might be surprised). The song sounds every bit as fresh today as it must have in ’73, which is probably a testament to the band’s far reaching influence (though I suspect that so much time has passed that there are tons of bands out there working a Big Star vibe who have never heard of Alex Chilton or Chris Bell).
It’s a great bit of power pop, and as I said before, if you’re not already hep to Big Star, go out and get you some.
See you on Monday.

Peace
Larry

*In 1990, my brother Chris and I took a road trip down south, mainly to visit friends in Georgia, but including stops in Chattanooga, Nashville and Memphis. A big part of our Memphis visit was a pilgrimage to Ardent Studios, where we saw the very Big Star supermarket that inspired the bands name.

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The Ticker Tapes – (A Figment of) Her Own Imagination

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Listen – The Ticker Tapes – (A Figment Of) Her Own Imagination – MP3

Greetings all.

I sit here writing this as the wind howls around me. We’re in the middle of yet another insane rain/wind storm, which has me peeking out the window every hour or so to make sure than we haven’t lost another huge tree limb. I don’t know if it’s our close proximity to the ocean that places us in the middle of this giant wind tunnel, but every once in a while we get a gust that sounds like it’s going to take the roof off. Unsettling to say the least.
That, and the fact that I’m fighting a cold and the onset of Spring allergies is making this a less than perfect weekend.
Not as unsettling (how’s that for a segue??) as the fact that although I’ve had this 45 for about 25 years I have never been able to track down any information about the Ticker Tapes.
I picked up ‘(A Figment of) Her Own Imagination’ back in the mod/garage days, and even included it on an old set of cassette comps that I put out back in the day.
The 45 was released in 1967 on the A Go Go label – which also featured Dr. West’s Medicine Show and Jug Band, which featured a young Norman Greenbaum – the Ticker Tapes (as far as I’ve been able to tell) sole 45 is a great, vaguely garagey take on the post-R&B/pre-psyche vibe of the Rolling Stones. There’s even a hint of the Music Machine banging around in ‘(A Figment of) Her Own Imagination’. It’s a really groovy record, pressed around an even groovier looking record label.
The label was out of Los Angeles, and distributed by Epic, but aside from that I haven’t been able to dig anything up. If any of you good people have anything to add, please drop me a line (or write something in the comments).
I hope you dig the tune, and I’ll be back later in the week with some sophisticated pop.


Peace

Larry

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for a new live soul mix.

PSS The Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive has been updated, now with 31 mixes!

Mariano and the Unbelievables – Wack Wack

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Mariano and the Unbelievables

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Listen – Mariano and the Unbelievables – Wack Wack – MP3

Greetings all.

As promised, I have returned to you, to close out the week with the soundtrack for your next swinging, space age, bachelor pad soiree, in the person(s) of Mariano and the Unbelievables.
Any record collector worth his or her salt will tell you that they’ve spent many an idle moment mooning over the albums pictured on the inner sleeves of 60s and 70s LPs. There, on the advertising in which just about every record of the era was wrapped (especially major label stuff) were tons of little, lo-res pictures of the rest of a given label’s current releases.
These sleeves almost always yield something interesting, since alongside the big hits and top selling artists, were scores of back-benchers that never really made it.
In some cases, especially with soul and jazz labels, this can be a frustrating practice since there always seems to be something cool that has never manifested itself (to you, anyway) in actual record form, i.e. an elusive tease the label chose to include on the sleeve, but only ever pressed up and distributed a handful of copies.
Sometimes you get lucky and after seeing pictures of a record for years, you actually dig up a hard copy to add to your crates.
Late last year, while checking out a previously unexplored record store, I happened upon several crates of cheap stuff, which proved to be a goldmine of obscure 60s pop and rock. One of the records in the stack I took home was one of those inner-sleeve obscurities come to life.
Though the name ‘Mariano and the Unbelievables’ was known to me, I had literally no idea what they sounded like. I assumed – mainly via the covers I’d seen – that there was a pop component to their sound, but until I got my hands on one of their albums I was unaware that they were a high concept baroque pop act.
The 60s, vast, far reaching laboratory of musical experimentation and exploration, was packed from end to end with interesting (if not always artistically successful) ideas. Baroque pop was one of these.
It seems kind of foolish to suggest that Baroque Pop was actually a genre unto itself. It was more like a flavoring, applied in varying degrees to actual progressive rock music, Top 40 pop and Easy sounds. Usually – at least to record collector types – it takes only the sound of a harpsichord (acoustic or electric) to affix the “baroque” designation to a given record. If you listen to a band like the Left Banke, that added baroque touches to actual quality songcraft, the results suggest that it would not be a waste to spend some quality time exploring their music.
On the other hand, you have some of Vic Mizzy’s tongue in cheek efforts on the soundtrack to the Addams Family where the harpsichord was basically musical shorthand for a kind of old timey elegance (though it was hard to maintain this conceit when you’re watching Lurch playing the instrument).
The music of Mariano and the Unbelievables falls somewhere in between those two extremes.
Led by Argentinian harpsichordist Mariano Moreno, Mariano and the Unbeleivables were clearly a gimmick act (baroque sounds applied to covers of contemporary pop and rock material), with their powdered wigs and brocade waistcoats, but a listen to their records reveals said gimmick to have been an enjoyable and well executed one.
Unlike so many other exploito, cash-ins of the day, Mariano and the Unbelievables’ (who actually toured with Donovan at one point) records are well played, arranged and produced. There are moments where the sounds creep over into pure easy listening territory, but as you’ll hear the tune I bring you today, you’ll see that there were moments of inspiration as well.
‘Wack Wack’ is a cover of a cut by soul jazzers Young-Holt Unlimited, and it sounds like it was lifted from a swinging party scene in a TV show or movie. Aside from the odd string quartet ‘breakdown’, the Mariano version of ‘Wack Wack’ is supremely groovy, coming close at times to the vibe of the Soulful Strings.
I hope you dig the cut, and I’ll be back on Monday.


Peace

Larry

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for a hard slice of Chicago sock soul!

PSS The Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive has been updated, now with 31 mixes!

Lost Souls – Sad Little Girl

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The Lost Souls

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Listen – The Lost Souls – Sad Little Girl – MP3

Greetings all.

Welcome to another turn in the interwebs barrel known as Iron Leg.
Not too long ago I hit the Asbury Lanes Garage Sale and Record Show, which, despite it’s small size and informal air, has turned out to be something of a minor goldmine for me. It may have something to do with the sliding scale of diminished expectations, but in the last year I’ve pulled some very nice stuff out of the milk crates and cardboard boxes lined up behind the actual lanes.
This last time, the fix (as they say) was in, since my man Mr Luther was there selling off some of his substantial archive of 45s. In the space of about ten minutes I dropped almost my entire supply of ready cash at his table (the fruits of which will be appearing in this space in the coming months). I got to adopt some excellent 45s, and we got to spend the afternoon catching up with each other (and Mick London, who stopped by as well).
Now, despite the fact that I pulled some gems out of those boxes, my record collector’s Spidey sense wouldn’t allow me to ignore all the other records in the room. Even though I didn’t have much money left, I decided to take a stroll and see what I could turn up.
This turned out to be what Gomez Addams used to refer to as a ‘capital idea!’ (Fester) since the first table I stopped at yielded a long time Latin soul want, and the next table gave up today’s selection.
As soon as I saw a 45 with the group name ‘Lost Souls’, and a Beau Brummel’s cover (Sad Little Girl, with Ron Elliot listed as ‘Roland’), my 60s garage antennae went up. The 45 was only a few buck, so I grabbed it, tossed it in the old messenger bag and took it home.
When I got home and played it what I discovered was a slow, dirgey take on the BBs tune, with that lo-fi vibe I love so much.
As it turns out, the Lost Souls were a North Dakota group that recorded two locally released 45s, one of which ‘Sad Little Girl’ b/w ‘Artificial Rose’ was picked up for national distribution by Liberty Records. Read the whole story here.
I hope you dig the tune, and I’ll be back later in the week with a little something for your next swinging cocktail-au-go-go party.


Peace

Larry

 

Example

PS Head over to Funky16Corners for a Chicago funk 45

PSS The Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive has been updated, now with 31 mixes!

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