Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #36

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Sunshine Company – Love That’s Where It Is (Imperial)
Candymen – Ways (ABC)
Tommy Roe – Aggravation (ABC)
Tommy Roe – Leave Her (ABC)
Chain Reaction – You Should Have Been Here Yesterday (Verve)
The Poor – My Mind Goes High (York)
The Turtles – She’s My Girl (White Whale)
Emmit Rhodes- Really Wanted You (ABC)
Rick Nelson – Don’t Make Promises (Decca)

British Walkers – I Found You (Try)
Changing Tymes – Free Spirit (She Comes On) (Bell)
Brian Hyland – The Joker Went Wild (Philips)
The Collage – Rainy Blue Day (Smash)
The Collage – Would You Like To Go (Smash)
Fun and Games – Elephant Candy (White Whale)
Fun and Games – The Grooviest Girl In the World (White Whale)
Jimmie Haskell – Prelude (ABC)
Jimmie Haskell/Denny Doherty – To Claudia On Thursday (ABC)
The Love Generation – The Love In Me (Imperial)

The Montanas – That’s When Happiness Began (WB)
Hondells – Just One More Chance (Columbia)
Coopers – Didn’t I (White Whale)
Nino Tempo and April Stevens with the Guilloteens – I Love How You Love Me (Atco)
Del Shannon – She (Liberty)
Cowsills – River Blue (MGM)
Eternity’s Children – Mrs Bluebird (Tower)
Chris and Peter Allen – Just Friends (Mercury)
Free Design – Kites Are Fun (Project 3)
Joyride – Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (World Pacific)
Van Dyke Parks – Come To the Sunshine (MGM)
Thom McCan Commercial

 

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 36 – 160MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

This month I was in the mood for some hooks and jangle, so I dipped into the archives and pulled out a bunch of groovy stuff. You get a grip of Curt Boettcher-associated material (songs, productions, arrangements), some soft pop, sunshine, bubblegum and even a bit of freakbeat.

Wait for a sunny day and play this one while you fly a kite (cuz kites are fun!).

See you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners

Pre-Monkee-fication: Sir Raleigh and the Coupons b/w Del Shannon

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Dewey Martin (above), Del Shannon (below)

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Listen/Download – Sir Raleigh and the Coupons – Tomorrow’s Gonna Be Another Day

Listen/Download – Del Shannon – She

Greetings all.

The tunes I bring you today ought to both be very familiar, of not in the versions you see here.

You already known I’m a big fan of Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart.

Despite their Monkees-related fame, both Boyce and Hart were working as successful songwriters prior to their association with the law firm of Dolenz, Jones, Nesmith and Tork.

Both of the records featured today are recordings of songs done by the Monkees, but done before the Monkees (get my drift?).

‘Tomorrow’s Gonna Be Another Day’, written by Boyce and Steve Venet (Venet co-wrote the theme to ‘Where the Action Is’ with Boyce and penned songs with Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich, in addition to co-writing ‘The Roach’ for Gene and Wendell), was recorded by a number of groups in the mid-60s, including the Astronauts and the Shadows of Knight.

The version you have here was waxed by Sir Raleigh and the Coupons in 1965.

Sir Raleigh was a pseudonym for a pre-Buffalo Springfield drummer/vocalist Dewey Martin. Sir Raleigh and the Coupons (the name a reference to a then-popular brand of cigarettes) recorded one 45 for Jerden (as well as one for Tower and another for A&M), which was also issued in Australia under the name ‘Sir Duncan and the Yo-Yos’.

Their version of ‘Tomorrow’s Gonna Be Another Day’ has a hard, garage edge to it (like the Astronauts take) with a great lead vocal by Martin and a wailing guitar solo.

Del Shannon had a run of hits that lasted from 1961 (with ‘Runaway’) to 1965 (with ‘Keep Searchin’’).

By the time he recorded his version of Boyce and Hart’s ‘She’ in 1966 (pre-dating the Monkees by a few months) he was in the grips of a dry spell that never really let up.

Despite the fact that he was a stranger to the charts, Shannon did some of his most interesting work in the mid-to-late 60s.

‘She’ (produced by Boyce and Hart) opens with fuzz guitar and combo organ, with some cool lead guitar punctuating things through the verse. Shannon’s vocals are predictably excellent, and the backing vocals are very cool, too.

I can only imagine that had he the kind of momentum the Monkees did, his version might have been the hit.

Both versions are very cool, and make me want to see the new Boyce and Hart documentary (a lot).

I hope you dig them, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

The Tygers – I Still Love Her

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The Tygers

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Listen/Download – The Tygers – I Still Love Her

Greetings all.

I hope all is well in your part of the universe.

The tune I bring you today was the final piece of a puzzle that ended abut 20 years of confusion.

Back in the olden days, when there were no internets to speak of and we all had to rely on record guides, fanzines and whatever first-hand/old-time stuff we could lay our hands on, we often had to rely on (often faulty) word of mouth when it came to researching music.

I remember picking up a 45 by Tony’s Tygers called ‘Little By Little’, and making the assumption that whatI had was a recording by the early Hunt and Tony Sales (sons of Soupy) band.

I labored under this assumption for a long, long time.

Then, a few years back I saw the 45 you see before you on a friend’s sales list, picked it up on his recommendation and dug it.

Though it was very poppy, seemingly rising from the conventional end of things, there was enough sonic coolness to pique my interest.

So I stepped out onto the web and before long I discovered two things:

First, these Tygers were the same band as Tony’s Tygers.

Second, they had nothing to do with the Sales brothers, having come from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

As it turns out, these Tygers (who competed locally with another band called the Tigers) recorded a handful of 45s and an LP for the local Teen Town label, before ‘Little By Little’ started to generate enough heat that A&M picked it up and re-released it nationally.

The vibe here is leaning in the direction of bubblegummy AM radio pop, yet seems to be drawing from the same stew of UK power pop, like the Who and the Move that their slightly southern neighbors the Choir were working with. There are times where the Tygers sound to me like the New Colony Six evolving from their earlier garage sound to their pop years.

Tony’s Tygers’ A&M deal didn’t go past that one single, but they continued to record and release stuff for Teen Town all the way to 1971.

Following the break up of the Tygers, Tony Dancy would move west and go on to write songs for Hanna-Barbera cartoon shows.

I hope you dig the track, and I’ll see you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Three by Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters

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Dave Van Ronk (right) and the Hudson Dusters

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Listen/Download – Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters – Clouds (From Both Sides Now)

Listen/Download – Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters – Alley Oop

Listen/Download – Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters – Head Inspector

Greetings all.

I come to you today to bend your ear (eyes?) about one of my personal favorites, the mighty Dave Van Ronk.

If you know Van Ronk, it is probably by his presence in the New York folk scene of the 50s and 60s, where he was a master of acoustic blues and just about anything else he set his mind to.

Van Ronk (pause here to read his great autobiography ‘The Mayor of MacDougal Street’) was a musical polymath, starting out (and occasionally finding his way back to) trad jazz, acoustic blues, Brecht and Weill, and – as you’ll hear today – genuinely interesting 60s rock.

I first encountered Van Ronk back in 1976 or 77 when I saw him perform in a televised memorial concert for Phil Ochs. I remember my father having some passing knowledge and appreciation for Van Ronk, and over the ensuing decades I dug as deeply into his oeuvre as the depth of my pockets and the availability if his records allowed.

It wasn’t until the early 90s, when a career-encompassing anthology called ‘A Chrestomathy’ was released that I had any idea that he had ever departed from the folk blues for which he was best known.

I can recall vividly the way by brow arched when in the middle of the first CD the music moved from a traditional ballad to a truly demented/inspired cover of the Hollywood Argyles’ ‘Alley Oop’.

‘What is this?’I wondered as I grabbed for the liner notes.

There wasn’t much there except a mention of a few of the tracks having been recorded by a group called ‘Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters’.

There was no information out there on the group, and I figured I’d have to be happy with what I had on he comp, until I happened upon a copy of the group’s 1967 Verve LP at a record show.

I was thrilled until I saw the price tag (I seem to remember that it was well over $50.00, a lot more than I could afford), so I passed on it, and – as these things often play out – didn’t see another copy for almost 20 years.

Fortunately, when I finally did get the album it was around ten bucks (with the growth of the internet and Ebay shaking all kinds of obscurities out into the light).

Extra-double-fortunately when I got to listen to/digimatize the whole record I was very happy to discover that it was not only as good as the tracks I’d heard, but better.

‘Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters’ is that rare beast, in which an artists steps outside of their familiar sound and instead of stepping in a steaming pile, actually does something interesting.

Though the sounds on the album are generally reminiscent of a certain New York freak scene early days vibe, i.e. electric Dylan, Fugs, Blues Project etc, it’s all mixed in with Van Ronk’s mighty voice and an unusual and unique sensibility.

The Hudson Dusters actually sound like a “band” (as opposed to a one-off dalliance). They were authentically weird, actually rock, and the songwriting (and the selection of cover material) is top notch.

The three tracks I bring you today are representative of the album as a whole, including one of the two pre-fame Joni Mitchell covers, my favorite original ‘Head Inspector’ and the aforementioned ‘Alley Oop’.

Van Ronk was an acquaintance of Mitchell’s in her early days, and his treatment of her songs ‘Clouds (From Both Sides Now)’ and ‘Chelsea Morning’ (two of the earliest recordings of those songs) manage to do them justice while giving them an interesting, Van Ronk-esque interpretations. ‘Clouds’ is especially poignant when you contrast Van Ronk’s delivery with the crystalline renditions by Mitchell and Judy Collins.

‘Head Inspector’ is a fantastic slice of New York freak folk rock, with ringing guitars and a solid rhythm section.

There are even times where it wanders (deliberately, perhaps?) into garagey territory. It is the best of the record’s (mostly excellent) original material.

The Hudson Dusters take on ‘Alley Oop’ still makes my ears perk up every time I play it. Here Van Ronk and band take on the 1960 Hollywood Argyles (actually a Kim Fowley/Gary Paxton studio concoction) is demented in every possible positive interpretation of that word. It opens with a slightly dissonant guitar riff, before the combo organ, bass and drums come in. The backing vocals arefairly conventional, but end up sounding weird when Van Ronk drops in with his delivery, sounding like a streetcorner preacher on a bender.

The Hudson Dusters manage to take the novelty tune and turn into into something inspired. It’s one of my favorite records of the era.

Unfortunately, the Hudson Dusters record has not been reissued. The band’s 45s and the LP aren’t terribly expensive these days, so if you dig what you hear (here) grab yourself the whole platter.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all on Monday.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #35

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Artie Schroeck Implosion – Six O’Clock (Verve)
Bud Shank – Coconut Grove (World Pacific)
Sound Symposium – Darling Be Home Soon (Dot)
Tony Hatch – Black Is Black (WB)
George Tipton – Rainmaker (WB)
Pat Williams – Don’t Leave Me (Verve)
Billy Vaughn – Time of the Season (Dot)

Gary McFarland – Get Back (Skye)
Bobby Bryant – While My Guitar Gently Weeps (World Pacific Jazz)
Don Randi – Tomorrow Never Knows (Reprise)
Cal Tjader – Lady Madonna (Skye)
Count Basie – Come Together (Tiger)
Freddy McCoy – I Am a Walrus (Prestige)
Living Guitars – Baby You’re Rich Man (Camden)
Mike Melvoin – Paperback Writer (Liberty)

Electric Tommy – Amazing Journey (Viva)
Electric Tommy – Sparks (Viva)
Enoch Light and the Light Brigade – Over Under Sideways Down (Project 3)
Ronnie Aldrich – Ride My Seesaw (London)
Helmut Zacharias – Hurdy Gurdy Man (Capitol)
Mariano and the Unbeleivables – Sunshine Superman (Capitol)
Living Guitars – San Franciscan Nights (Camden)

Freddy McCoy – Pet Sounds (Prestige)
Liberace – Suite Judy Blue Eyes (WB)
Sound Symposium – America (Dot)
Paul Horn – Eight Miles High (RCA)
Living Guitars – Out and About (Camden)
Roger Coulam – Dizzy (Contour)
101 Strings – Spinning Wheel (Alshire)

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 35 – 191MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I know I said last week that I would be posting some Dave Van Ronk stuff this week, but I forgot that I already had this month’s podcast in the can, so Dave and his pals will be along next week.

This month, the Iron Leg Radio Show is dedicated completely to instrumental covers of 60s pop and rock tunes from all ends of the instro spectrum. There are jazzers, easy listening, Moog, pop orchestras, you name it, there’s something here for everyone.

It is a groovy collection, and I hope you dig it.

See you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Elvis Costello and the Attractions – You Belong To Me

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Elvis says “Whut???”

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Listen/Download – Elvis Costello and the Attractions – You Belong To Me

Greetings all.

Every once in a while even the most jaded of collectors needs to be reminded that he/she is not omnipotent of infallible (you shouldn’t need to be reminded, but we are after all taking about record collectors, so…).

Back in the olden days, when I was in high school and new wave was (new) I used to sit at the same lunch table as a couple of marginal characters (at least I thought they were marginal at the time) named Bob and Alan.

Like most non-athletic adolescent boys of the time we spent an inordinate amount of time discussing/arguing about music.

I had recently discovered Bad Company.

Yeah…

Though Bob and Alan were both hard rock aficionados as well, their tastes ran to KISS (I’m still ambivalent), but they had already started to progress by digging into bands like the Clash and Elvis Costello and the Attractions.

I had spent most of my early teen-hood obsessing about the Beatles, and was as a result a case of musical arrested development. I was suspicious of anything even vaguely punk-adjacent, so when the boys started rapping about Elvis, I kind of rolled my eyes and ran the opening chords of ‘Can’t Get Enough Of Your Love’ through my head for the thousandth time.

Flash forward a year or two, and the unfinished synapse that started with the Beatles closed its circuit when I discovered how much of debt new wave and power pop owed to the Fabs and every other pop and jangle band of the 60s.

Before long I was scouring the local flea market for commercial stuff like the Cars and the Romantics listening to college radio.

Then, in college, a friend whipped Elvis’s ‘Armed Forces’ album on me. I immediately threw down my arms, hoisted the flag of surrender and joined Oliver’s Army.

I had seen the Attractions on Saturday Night Live, and Elvis and his spasmodic affect struck me the wrong way (though I remember digging DEVO, so maybe it was a case of ‘weird but not quite weird enough’ or something like that, but when the dulcet tones of ‘Armed Forces’ wormed their way into my head, I discovered that the four-eyed goon staggering around the stage was a songwriter of no small talent and deserved my attention after all.

I eventually found my way back through EC’s early albums – losing track some time in the early 80s when his prolific nature outpaced my interest and bank account – and discovered that there was much gold to be dug.

The record that really knocked me for a loop was the second by EC and the Attractions, 1978’s ‘This Year’s Model’, and the track that I wore the grooves out on was the one you see before you, ‘You Belong To Me’.

I suspect that my 1980s garage-mania has a lot to do with why I love this song so much, since there’s more than a touch of the Pebbles at work here.

You get the ringing guitar riff, the elbows-on-the-keyboard combo organ and the kick of the bass and drums, all of it with roots that reach back to 1966 (thanks to Nick Lowe for the production). I always find myself wishing that someone back in the garage revival days had glommed onto this one but I suspect that such a move would have been perceived as apostate (no matter how hip in real life).

The groovy 45 you see before you was picked up (along with half a dozen others by EC) whilst out digging in the hinterlands of New York last summer.

I hope you dig the track, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #34

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Underdogs –Love’s Gone Bad (VIP)
Jacques Dutronc – Et Moi Et Moi Et Moi (Vogue)
Bobby Brelyn – Hannah (Jorel)
Mars Bonfire – Ride With Me (UNI)
Chris and Peter Allen – My Silent Symphony (Mercury)
Ruthann – Carry On (Glittering Dancer) (Reprise)
Utica Club Natural Carbonation Band – Utica Club Natural Carbonation Beer Drinking Song (Utica Club)
Jim Lowe – Michael J Pollard For President (Buddah)
Jefferson Airplane Levis Commercial

The Eagles – Eagle (Warner Brothers)
Bucky Wilkin – I Wanna Be Free (RCA)
Bucky Wilkin – Delta Day (RCA)
John Buck Wilkin – Faces and Places (Liberty) 
John Buck Wilkin – My God and I (Liberty)
John Buck Wilkin – Boy of the Country (Liberty)
John Buck Wilkin – Apocalypse 1969 (Liberty)
John Buck Wilkin – Me and Bobby McGee (Liberty)
John Buck Wilkin – The Daydream (Liberty)
Sopwith Camel Levis Commercial

Buck Wilkin – Going On (UA)
Buck Wilkin – Get Up (UA)
Buck Wilkin – Down On Music Row (UA)
Buck Wilkin – Star Spangled Girl (UA)
Buck Wilkin – Sun, Moon and Stars (UA)
Canned Heat Levis Commercial

Boyce and Hart Coke Commercial
Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart – Where Angels Go Trouble Follows (A&M)
Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart- Out and About (A&M)
Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart – Sometimes She’s a Little Girl (A&M)
Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart- Blow You a Kiss In the Wind (Aquarian)
Curt Boettcher Levis Commercial

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 34 – 197MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have some cool stuff for you this time around, including all kinds of new arrivals, a long look at the sounds of unjustly forgotten Nashville rocker John Buck Wilkin and a set of Boyce and Hart action.

As always, I hope you dig the sounds.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners

Scotty McKay – All Around the World

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Scotty McKay

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Listen/Download – Scotty McKay – All Around the World

Greetings all.

I thought I’d whip something tasty on you this week.

I have known the name Scotty McKay since back in the garage/mod days when his raving 1967 version of ‘Train Kept A Rolling’ (long rumored to include a solo by Jimmy Page) got comped a few times.

What I did not know, and wouldn’t learn until I dug up the record you see before you today is that McKay (born Max Lipscomb?!) was, in the 50s and 60s a veritable rock’n’roll Zelig.

As a teenager he played rhythm guitar in Gene Vincent’s Blue Caps, then went on to record in a variety of styles (rockabilly, pop, R&B) into the 60s, when he changed his name.

A Texas native, he played alongside bands like the Chessmen and Kenny and the Kasuals (he would record with the latter) while releasing a series of 45s.

The Jimmy Page story varies from place to place, but it seems McKay met the Yardbirds when they were touring through Texas and the connection was made. It seems that McKay recorded the track and sent the tape to the UK where Jimmy added his plucking and sent it back.

The tune I bring you today is a little burner that McKay laid down in 1966 on the flipside of a tune called ‘Here Comes Batman’.

The ‘Batman’ side was popular and got the record pressed on a few different labels.

His cover of Titus Turner’s ‘All Around the World’ (aka ‘Grits Ain’t Groceries’) is taken at a fast pace and sits on the Bobby Fuller side of the garage border.

McKay and his band would go on to appear in a couple of low-budget horror movies (there appear to have been a few efforts to turn him into a teen idol).

He went on to produce some records (including the pre-ZZ Top American Blues) eventually turning to religious music. He passed away in 1991.

I hope you dig the track and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Freddy Cannon – 20th Century Fox

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Freddy Cannon, and some cannonballs (natch…)

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Listen/Download – Freddy Cannon – 20th Century Fox

Greetings all.

I hope the new week finds you well.

One of my great pleasures as a collector of music (not just records, my friends…) is happening upon an unexpected gem in someone’s catalog.

I think I first heard Freddy Cannon’s cover of the Doors ‘20th Century Fox’ when a friend (hey Chuck!) posted it on Facebook, and I was knocked back on my heels.

While I wouldn’t say that I’d done a serious study of the Freddy Cannon discography, I was certainly acquainted with his biggest hits – and a few of the lesser-known numbers – and dug a lot of it.

I remember watching 1965’s ‘Village of the Giants’and seeing Freddy working it out on ‘Little Bitty Corinne’ (later covered by the Swinging Neckbreakers) and hearing his theme (there were others) for ‘Where the Action Is’, which was his second-to-last chart hit that same year.

Now, looking at (or better yet, listening to) Freddy’s biggest records, one might be forgiven for raising an eyebrow when encountering him covering a song by the Doors.

That said, he does an outstanding job, revving things up just a touch with a little bit of that mid-60s proto-garage kick. The record benefits from the removal of the original’s most recognizable element, that being the likkered up, Laurel Canyon croon of ol’Jimbo the Lizard King.

Cannon adds in some harmonica, fuzzed out guitar and of course his vocals.

It does what every cover should strive to do, which is twist the source material just enough to squeeze out some new juice. This isn’t always possible – I can only think of a handful of Doors songs (outside of Light My Fire) that got covers – but Freddy pulls it off.

If you find yourself a copy of this burner grab it, since the flip ‘Cincinnatti Woman’ is excellent as well.

I hope you dig it, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

The Creation – Try and Stop Me

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The Creation

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Listen/Download – The Creation – Try and Stop Me

Greetings all.

A few weeks back, when I posted John Wonderling’s original version of ‘Midway Down’, I started thinking about the Creation.

I eventually found my way back into the crates, and dug out the 45 you see before you today.

The other side of this record (‘Making Time’) saw the light of day in this space nearly six years ago, not long after I got my hands on it.

As I stated then, back in the garage/mod days of the 80s, the Creation loomed large with our set.

The subset of bands that intersected with the freakbeat vibe were a very big deal for us in that they covered the bases for the folks with a taste for pop, as well as those of us (often the same people) who liked things with a slightly harder edge.

Though they were only really a going concern for two years (1966-1967) the Creation laid down some of the finest 45s of that transitional era.

‘Try and Stop Me’, co-written by Kenny Pickett and Eddie Phillips is pure pop, but it’s all laid atop some heavy, gritty guitars.

The Creation are often compared – for fairly obvious reasons – with the Who, and when you sit down and listen to their records it is a favorable comparison indeed.

I wouldn’t go as far as to suggest that anyone in the Creation had the creative reach of Pete Townshend, but for pure listenability, they were right up there.

Sadly, the Creation never had the kind of success that their music deserved, only charting twice in the UK (with Making Time and Painterman, both in 1966), though they had more success on the Continent.

Fortunately for everyone, the Creation’s recordings have been available in reissue fairly steadily since the 80s (you can even find them on iTunes!).

I hope you dig the track, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

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