Iron Leg Radio Show #39

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
The Cocktail Cabinet – Breathalyser (Page One)
Locomotive – Rudi’s In Love (Bell)
Earth Quake – I Get the Sweetest Feeling (A&M)
Harper and Rowe – Here Comes Yesterday Again (World Pacific)
Hal Blaine – Drums A Go Go (Dunhill)
Kim Fowley – Born to Be Wild (Imperial)
Wild Angels Promo

Bobby Sty – Incense and Peppermints (Hit Sounds)
Mike Landers – Hush (Hit Sounds)
Mike Landers – I Can See For Miles (Hit Sounds)
Mustang – Haight Ashbury Time (Somerset)
Mustang – The Acid Test (Somerset)
Soul Strings and a Funky Horn – Grazing In the Grass (Solid State)
Sam Wright Group – Green Onions (Curio)
Tommy Knight and the Knights – Tighten Up (Promenade)
Psych-Out Promo

Associated Soul Group – Are You Experienced (Contessa)
Electric Piano Playground – I Had Too Much To Dream Last Night (Bell)
Electric Piano Playground – Good Vibrations (Bell)
Electronic Concept Orchestra – Aquarius (Limelight)
Electric Indian – Storm Warning (UA)
Electric Tommy – Overture (Viva)
Marketts – Come to the Sunshine (World Pacific)
Stapleton-Morley Expression – Creeque Alley (Dunhill)
Stapleton-Morley Expression – 12:30 (Young Girls Are Coming to the Canyon) (Dunhill)
Stapleton-Morley Expression – San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair) (Dunhill)
101 Strings – A Taste of Soul (Alshire)
The Trip Promo

JP Rags – Scruffety (World Pacific)
JP Rags – The Bells 0f St Barbara (World Pacific)
JP Rags – Still Life (World Pacific)
Karen Karsh – Wasn’t Born To Follow (Dunhill)
Karen Karsh – Musty Dusty (Dunhill)
Brady Bunch – I Just Want To Be Your Friend (Paramount)
The Collage – Would You Like To Go (Smash)
New Life – Canterbury Road (Epic)
Wild In the Streets Promo

 

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 39 – 222MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

This time out I have a nice, long show for you, with more than two hours of sonic wonderment.

We get things off to a start with some groovy new arrivals, segue into two long sets looking at the various and sundry types of musical exploitation, and then some softer sounds to round out the show.

If this is your first taste, make sure to drop into the archive in the header and check out the previous 38 (?!?) episodes.

I think you’ll dig it.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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The Shillings – Children and Flowers b/w Lying and Trying

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The Shillings

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Listen/Download – The Shillings – Children and Flowers

Listen/Download – The Shillings – Lying and Trying

Greetings all.

The tracks I bring to you this fine day are a stellar example of East Coast folk/pop.

The Shillings (of which there were many, but these cats were from Eastern, PA) released several 45s on labels like Fontana, Virtue and Three Rivers in 1966 and 1967.

They hailed from the Allentown area and played local ten clubs like the Mod Mill and King Arthur’s Court.

The record you see before you was released in 1966.

‘Children and Flowers’, written by Jackie DeShannon, had already been a minor hit for New Jersey’s Critters in 1965.

DeShannon recorded – but did not release – her own version, which later surfaced on the CD reissue of the ‘Laurel Canyon’ LP.

The Shillings version takes the Sunset Strip folk rock sound and dials it down a notch, softening it up with a dose of AM pop.

The flipside of the 45, ‘Lying and Trying’ (written by group member Tom Ross) was actually a regional hit, charting in the Top 20 in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

‘Lying and Trying’ follows the same basic formula, with just enough jangle and drums to be taken seriously, but poppy enough to keep the teenyboppers interested.

I especially dig the guitar solo.

The Shillings  broke up in 1968.

You can pick up a collection of the Shillings recordings, entitled ‘Hoagie Shop’ (including these two songs) in iTunes!

I hope you dig the tunes, and I’ll see you next week with a new episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

Peace

Larry

 

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Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #38

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw and Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
The Van Dyke Parks –Number Nine (MGM)
The Van Dyke Parks – Do What You Wanta (MGM)
Van Dyke Parks – Come To the Sunshine (MGM)
Van Dyke Parks – Farther Along (MGM)
The Byrds – 5D (Columbia)
The Byrds – Voices of Vista Segment/Don’t Make Waves
Cheetah Club Commercial

Manfred Mann – 5-4-3-2-1 (Prestige)
Manfred Mann – The One In the Middle (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – Come Tomorrow (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – Dashing Away With a Smoothing Iron (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – I’m Your Kingpin (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – It’s Gonna Work Out Fine (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – Untie Me (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – Sack O Woe (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – Watermelon Man (Ascot)
Manfred Mann – Watch Your Step (EMI) Mann Made

Jerry Blavat and the Yon Teenagers – Discophonic Walk (Favor)
Jerry Blavat – The Geator and the Geatorettes – Tasty (To Me) (Bond)
Jerry Blavat The Geator and the Geatorettes – All Be Joyous (Bond)
The Esko Affair – Morning Dull Fires (Mercury)

Eldridge Holmes – If I Were a Carpenter (Deesu)
ZZ Hill – Don’t Make Promises (Kent)
The Dillards – Reason to Believe (Elektra)
Bobby Darin – Misty Roses (Atlantic)
Bobby Darin – Red Balloon (Atlantic)
Wayne Cochran – If I Were Carpenter (King)
Gary Puckett and the Union Gap – Don’t Make Promises (Columbia)
Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick and Tich – If I Were a Carpenter (Imperial)

 

 

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 38 – 172MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have a very groovy collection of sounds for you this month, with sets devoted to Van Dyke Parks, Manfred Mann, the long lost musical career of Jerry ‘The Geator’ Blavat, and some very cool covers of Tim Hardin songs.

I think you’ll dig it.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Tom Northcott – 1941 / Sunny Goodge Street

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A Euro P/S for 1941

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Listen/Download – Tom Northcott – 1941

Listen/Download – Tom Northcott – Sunny Goodge Street

Greetings all.

I can’t remember when I first became aware of Tom Northcott, but I am pretty sure that I knew his name for years before I ever heard a note of the music he made.

Northcott, who was based in British Columbia, in Canada made all of his records in the relatively short window of 1965 to 1971.

Though he made a few regional records in Canada, Northcott is best remembered these days for a series of 45s he did for Warner Brothers in the mid-to-late 60s and an LP he recorded for UNI in 1971.

He had the kind of high, clear tenor voice that was very popular during the folk revival.

He recorded a couple of folk rock 45s with the Tom Northcott Trio and the Vancouver Playboys before signing with Warner Brothers in 1967.

Northcott recorded a variety of cover and original material, waxing songs by Bob Dylan (‘Girl of the North Country’), Nilsson (‘1941’) and Donovan (‘Sunny Goodge Street’), all of which were Canadian hits in 1967 and 1968.

I bring you the latter two tracks today, because of all the Northcott material I’ve managed to find, they are my favorites.

As a certified Nilsson freak, I am constitutionally incapable of passing up a cover version of ‘1941’, and Northcott’s is excellent.

Both of these 45s were recorded in Los Angeles, produced by Lenny Waronker and Leon Russell and arranged by Russell as well.

Northcott takes ‘1941’ at a much faster pace than any of the other versions I’ve heard (which tend to hew closely to the Nilsson original) and it’s a refreshing change of pace. Though Russell adds in some brass, the arrangement isn’t too busy.

His version of Donovan’s ‘Sunny Goodge Street’ is a much more ornate, upbeat take on the song. The original is a quiet, meandering affair with a jazz combo and a bowed bass violin. Northcott’s version is a bright, baroque popsike waltz, with accordion, and what sounds like a cimbalom, producing an almost calliope-like effect.

There’s a very cool video of an appearance that Northcott made on the Canadian TV show ‘Where It’s At’ performing ‘Sunny Goodge Street’ and ‘Girl From the North Country’ (hosted by Lulu. No less!).

Northcott’s UNI LP is a slightly more rock-oriented project, including covers of Leonard Cohen, Randy Newman and a cool version of the Move’s ‘Blackberry Way’. It tends not to be very expensive and I would highly recommend you pick it up if you dig the tracks I’ve posted today.

Rhino Handmade released a comp of Northcott’s Warner Brothers material, but it appears to be long out of print.

Interestingly, not long after his 1971 LP, Northcott left the music business to become a commercial fisherman, and later got a law degree, specializing in maritime law.

There’s a video on YouTube of a 1988 Canadian TV show with an interview with Northcott (fast forward to around 4:30).

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #37

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Bobby Fuller Four – Gallancamps Shoes Commercial
Bobby Fuller Four – Let Her Dance (Mustang)
Bobby Fuller Four – Another Sad and Lonely Night (Mustang)
Bobby Fuller Four – KHJ Big Kahuna Theme
Bobby Fuller Four – Take My Word (Mustang)
Bobby Fuller Four – Never To Be Forgotten (Mustang)
Bobby Fuller Four – KRLA King of the Wheels Theme

Free Design – 2002 a Hit Song (Project 3)
Free Design – Kites are Fun (Project 3)
Free Design – Butterflies are Free (Project 3)
Free Design – Bubbles (Project 3)
Free Design – California Dreaming (Project 3)
Free Design – Eleanor Rigby (Project 3)
Free Design – Kije’s Ouija (Project 3)
Free Design – Where Do I Go (Project 3)
Free Design – My Brother Woody (Project 3)
Free Design – Stay Another Season (Project 3)
Free Design – Windows of the World (Project 3)
Free Design – I Found Love (Project 3)
Free Design – Jack In the Box Commercial

Paul Butterfield Blues Band – Mary Mary (Elektra)
Dave Clark Five – All Night Long (Epic)
Glen Campbell – Bowling Green (Capitol)
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band – These Days (Liberty)
Donovan – Tangerine Puppet (Hickory)
Jake Thackray – The Black Swan (Philips)
The Beach Boys – Feel Flow (Brother/WB)
The Beach Boys – Surf’s Up (Brother/WB)
The Beach Boys – Til I Die (Brother/WB)

 

 

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 37 – 172MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

This month you get a set of groovers by the Bobby Fuller Four, a look at the sounds of one of my favorite pop groups, the Free Design as well as a set of new arrivals.

I hope you dig it all, and if you’re new to the Iron Leg Radio Show, take a dip in the archive.

See you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Bowling Green Times Two

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The Everly Brothers

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Glen Campbell

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Listen/Download – the Everly Brothers – Bowling Green

Listen/Download – Glen Campbell – Bowling Green

Greetings all.

I hope the new week finds you all well.

I had planned on bringing you the Everly Brothers (original) version of ‘Bowling Green’ for a while.

Fortunately for all of us, whilst I was a-digging through the crates I discovered that I had another, very groovy version of the song already, by none other than Glen Campbell.

I should start out by saying that the recent news of Campbell moving in to an assisted living facility due to the progression of Alzheimer’s disease was saddening.

Glen Campbell is one of those artists who had enough mainstream success that the true depth of his talent (and discography) is often overlooked.

He was an important part of the famous Wrecking Crew studio outfit, as well as having recorded some very cool albums for Capitol in the 1960s.

Though he is often thought of as a country-pop artist, he had excellent taste in covers and recorded many great songs by folks like Harry Nilsson, Donovan, Sonny Curtis, The Bee Gees, Otis Redding, Dorsey Burnett and even Paul Revere and the Raiders.

The song I bring you today was first recorded by the Everly Brothers (on their excellent ‘Everly Brothers Sing’ LP) in 1967.

‘Bowling Green’, written by the Everly’s bassist Terry Slater with Jacqueline Ertel (I don’t know why she’s not credited on either of these labels) was a Top 40 hit for the brothers in the Spring of 1967.

Campbell recorded it later that year on his ‘Gentle On My Mind’ LP.

While the Everly’s version features their unmatchable harmonies, Campbell’s take on the song sports a much livelier arrangement by none other than Leon Russell!

Interestingly, the song was recorded again, a year later by the Gosdin Brothers, who gave it a slightly more countrified feel.

Both versions are excellent, and I would recommend picking up both albums (especially the Everly Brothers LP which has some surprising, even psychedelic touches) if you find them.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #36

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Sunshine Company – Love That’s Where It Is (Imperial)
Candymen – Ways (ABC)
Tommy Roe – Aggravation (ABC)
Tommy Roe – Leave Her (ABC)
Chain Reaction – You Should Have Been Here Yesterday (Verve)
The Poor – My Mind Goes High (York)
The Turtles – She’s My Girl (White Whale)
Emmit Rhodes- Really Wanted You (ABC)
Rick Nelson – Don’t Make Promises (Decca)

British Walkers – I Found You (Try)
Changing Tymes – Free Spirit (She Comes On) (Bell)
Brian Hyland – The Joker Went Wild (Philips)
The Collage – Rainy Blue Day (Smash)
The Collage – Would You Like To Go (Smash)
Fun and Games – Elephant Candy (White Whale)
Fun and Games – The Grooviest Girl In the World (White Whale)
Jimmie Haskell – Prelude (ABC)
Jimmie Haskell/Denny Doherty – To Claudia On Thursday (ABC)
The Love Generation – The Love In Me (Imperial)

The Montanas – That’s When Happiness Began (WB)
Hondells – Just One More Chance (Columbia)
Coopers – Didn’t I (White Whale)
Nino Tempo and April Stevens with the Guilloteens – I Love How You Love Me (Atco)
Del Shannon – She (Liberty)
Cowsills – River Blue (MGM)
Eternity’s Children – Mrs Bluebird (Tower)
Chris and Peter Allen – Just Friends (Mercury)
Free Design – Kites Are Fun (Project 3)
Joyride – Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (World Pacific)
Van Dyke Parks – Come To the Sunshine (MGM)
Thom McCan Commercial

 

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 36 – 160MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

This month I was in the mood for some hooks and jangle, so I dipped into the archives and pulled out a bunch of groovy stuff. You get a grip of Curt Boettcher-associated material (songs, productions, arrangements), some soft pop, sunshine, bubblegum and even a bit of freakbeat.

Wait for a sunny day and play this one while you fly a kite (cuz kites are fun!).

See you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Three by Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters

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Dave Van Ronk (right) and the Hudson Dusters

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Listen/Download – Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters – Clouds (From Both Sides Now)

Listen/Download – Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters – Alley Oop

Listen/Download – Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters – Head Inspector

Greetings all.

I come to you today to bend your ear (eyes?) about one of my personal favorites, the mighty Dave Van Ronk.

If you know Van Ronk, it is probably by his presence in the New York folk scene of the 50s and 60s, where he was a master of acoustic blues and just about anything else he set his mind to.

Van Ronk (pause here to read his great autobiography ‘The Mayor of MacDougal Street’) was a musical polymath, starting out (and occasionally finding his way back to) trad jazz, acoustic blues, Brecht and Weill, and – as you’ll hear today – genuinely interesting 60s rock.

I first encountered Van Ronk back in 1976 or 77 when I saw him perform in a televised memorial concert for Phil Ochs. I remember my father having some passing knowledge and appreciation for Van Ronk, and over the ensuing decades I dug as deeply into his oeuvre as the depth of my pockets and the availability if his records allowed.

It wasn’t until the early 90s, when a career-encompassing anthology called ‘A Chrestomathy’ was released that I had any idea that he had ever departed from the folk blues for which he was best known.

I can recall vividly the way by brow arched when in the middle of the first CD the music moved from a traditional ballad to a truly demented/inspired cover of the Hollywood Argyles’ ‘Alley Oop’.

‘What is this?’I wondered as I grabbed for the liner notes.

There wasn’t much there except a mention of a few of the tracks having been recorded by a group called ‘Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters’.

There was no information out there on the group, and I figured I’d have to be happy with what I had on he comp, until I happened upon a copy of the group’s 1967 Verve LP at a record show.

I was thrilled until I saw the price tag (I seem to remember that it was well over $50.00, a lot more than I could afford), so I passed on it, and – as these things often play out – didn’t see another copy for almost 20 years.

Fortunately, when I finally did get the album it was around ten bucks (with the growth of the internet and Ebay shaking all kinds of obscurities out into the light).

Extra-double-fortunately when I got to listen to/digimatize the whole record I was very happy to discover that it was not only as good as the tracks I’d heard, but better.

‘Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters’ is that rare beast, in which an artists steps outside of their familiar sound and instead of stepping in a steaming pile, actually does something interesting.

Though the sounds on the album are generally reminiscent of a certain New York freak scene early days vibe, i.e. electric Dylan, Fugs, Blues Project etc, it’s all mixed in with Van Ronk’s mighty voice and an unusual and unique sensibility.

The Hudson Dusters actually sound like a “band” (as opposed to a one-off dalliance). They were authentically weird, actually rock, and the songwriting (and the selection of cover material) is top notch.

The three tracks I bring you today are representative of the album as a whole, including one of the two pre-fame Joni Mitchell covers, my favorite original ‘Head Inspector’ and the aforementioned ‘Alley Oop’.

Van Ronk was an acquaintance of Mitchell’s in her early days, and his treatment of her songs ‘Clouds (From Both Sides Now)’ and ‘Chelsea Morning’ (two of the earliest recordings of those songs) manage to do them justice while giving them an interesting, Van Ronk-esque interpretations. ‘Clouds’ is especially poignant when you contrast Van Ronk’s delivery with the crystalline renditions by Mitchell and Judy Collins.

‘Head Inspector’ is a fantastic slice of New York freak folk rock, with ringing guitars and a solid rhythm section.

There are even times where it wanders (deliberately, perhaps?) into garagey territory. It is the best of the record’s (mostly excellent) original material.

The Hudson Dusters take on ‘Alley Oop’ still makes my ears perk up every time I play it. Here Van Ronk and band take on the 1960 Hollywood Argyles (actually a Kim Fowley/Gary Paxton studio concoction) is demented in every possible positive interpretation of that word. It opens with a slightly dissonant guitar riff, before the combo organ, bass and drums come in. The backing vocals arefairly conventional, but end up sounding weird when Van Ronk drops in with his delivery, sounding like a streetcorner preacher on a bender.

The Hudson Dusters manage to take the novelty tune and turn into into something inspired. It’s one of my favorite records of the era.

Unfortunately, the Hudson Dusters record has not been reissued. The band’s 45s and the LP aren’t terribly expensive these days, so if you dig what you hear (here) grab yourself the whole platter.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all on Monday.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Eric Andersen – Honey

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Eric Andersen

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Listen/Download – Eric Andersen – Honey

Greetings all.

The tune I bring you today is one of those odd points on the line where a pejorative prophecy of sorts is fulfilled.

Those of you that are not deeply into the world of 60s/70s singer-songwriter sounds, or lack a grasp on the Village folk scene of the 60s may not know the name Eric Andersen.

I would however venture a guess that you have heard some of his songs.

Back in the day, when he was one of the many ‘new Dylans’ (the prophecy referred to above) he penned some truly remarkable tunes, including ‘Violets of Dawn’, ‘Thirsty Boots’ and ‘Close the Door Lightly’.

Eric Andersen was a talented singer and writer who also happened to have movie star good looks. Unfortunately, the 1960s was an era packed so tightly with talent and charisma that sometimes even those with all of the right moves didn’t make it all the way to ‘star’.

That Andersen – who has been recording steadily since 1965 – was branded one of the many ‘new Dylans’ (which I referred to as pejorative since the title ended up as an albatross around many necks during the 60s and 70s) isn’t surprising, but his 1968 LP ‘Tin Can Alley’ didn’t do anything to shake it off.

He had already electrified his sound the previous year with ‘’Bout Changes and Things Take 2’ (which was, oddly enough, an electrified re-recording of 1966’s ‘Bout Changes and Things’), but ‘Tin Can Alley’ really pushes into ‘electrified Dylan’ territory.

This is not to say that the album is bad (it’s pretty good) but rather that you look back wishing that some artists had taken the counterintuitive tack and not locked into what seemed like the obvious groove.

‘Honey’, recorded with a who’s who of NY studio heads (including Al Kooper) is a line drive right down the main street of Dylan-town, sounding like a slightly more energetic ‘Highway 61’ outtake.

For something a little more ambitious and interesting, stay tuned for next week’s look at Dave Van Ronk and the Hudson Dusters.

See you then.

Peace

Larry

 

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Brewer & Shipley – Truly Right / Time and Changes

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Michael Brewer and Tom Shipley

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Listen/Download – Brewer & Shipley – Truly Right

Listen/Download – Brewer & Shipley – Time and Changes

Greetings all.

The two tunes I bring you today can be filed as ‘familiar sounds from an unfamiliar source’.

Both of these songs are better known via their recording by other groups, but here they are presented by their authors, Michael Brewer and Tom Shipley.

Brewer and Shipley are themselves better known by their later recordings, like their 1971 hit ‘One Toke Over the Line’.

The two musicians had been bouncing around the LA scene in the mid-60s, writing and recording prior to their better known partnership.

They had composed (by themselves or as a pair) songs for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Byrds, Noel Harrison, the Poor, Glenn Yarbrough, HP Lovecraft and the Garden Club (basically a duet between Shipley and Ruthann Friedman).

I first heard ‘Truly Right’ on the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s 1967 ‘Ricochet’ LP which also featured a couple of very early songs written by Jackson Browne. It quickly became a favorite (the group’s first two LPs are lost classics of mid-60s LA) but it was a while before I figured out that the composers of the song were THE Brewer & Shipley.

That same year, the Poor, featuring a young Randy Meisner, would record Shipley’s song ‘She’s Got the Time (She’s Got the Changes)’, one of the finest bits of Sunset Strip popsike ever made.

Flash forward a few years and I find out that Brewer and Shipley recorded their own LP in 1968 entitled’Down In LA’ and that it included their versions of the two songs mentioned above.

The approach is much more relaxed/Laurel Canyon hippy than the harder edged pop of the NGDB and the Poor.

‘Truly Right’, which opens with acoustic guitar gains speed gradually, with the bass and drums coming in a bit at a time, until the whole band is moving along (with some groovy electric piano – courtesy of Leon Russell – running underneath). Brewer and Shipley lay down some very nice harmonies.

‘Time and Changes’ (truncated title, same song) is taken at a mellower, less popsike pace than the Poor’s version, but the overall effect is excellent. As much as I love the Poor 45, the Brewer and Shipley version has that late-60s, LA harmony vibe that reminds me of some of the cooler CSNY tracks.

If you can get your hands on the ‘Down In LA’ album, grab it because it expands on the vibe, working in a little bit of country rock, all the songs presented by B&S’s great harmonies.

Oddly, by the time ‘Down In LA’ was released, Brewer and Shipley had departed from the coast and relocated to Kansas City, MO.

They went on to have a hit with ‘One Toke Over the Line’ and its LP ‘Tarkio’ in 1971.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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