Terry Knight and the Pack – Got Love

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Terry Knight and the Pack

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Listen/Download – Terry Knight and the Pack – Got Love

Greetings all.

Welcome back to the old leg of iron.

I hope you all had a chance to pull down the ones and zeros on this month’s Iron Leg Radio Show. If you haven’t you can always grab that, or any of the 27 previous episodes out of the archive.

The tune I bring you today is a smoking bit of 1966 garage band blues-mangling.

Terry Knight and the Pack are best known as one of the petri dishes out of which the mighty Grand Funk Railroad emerged, having featured Don Brewer, and for a brief time Mark Farner in its ranks, as well as future GFR manager Knight at the helm.

The group released nine singles and a couple of LPs for the Lucky Eleven label between 1965 and 1967, many of which were regional hits and a couple – the Yardbirds cover ‘Mister You’re a Better Man Than I’ and a version of Ben E King’s ‘I (Who Have Nothing)’ – that charted nationally.

Knight and the Pack really managed to tune into the Stones/Yardbirds influenced end of the garage spectrum, adding in just enough snot, jangle and fuzz to make a respectable showing.

‘Got Love’ is a garaged-out “expansion’ on Slim Harpo’s ‘Got Love If You Want It’ with some far-out, echoey harmonica, Bo Diddley drums and combo organ.

If you geta chance to pick up the group’s self-titled 1966 LP do so, since there’s a lot more to dig on it, including the fuzz-bomb ‘Numbers’, covers of the Yardbirds and the Stones and a couple of very groovy originals.

After Knight left the group to go solo, the band soldiered on, recording few more 45s as The Pack/Fabulous Pack before (forgive me…) pack-ing it in and evolving into Grand Funk.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

The Finnz – East Side Story

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Dennis Quinn and Robert Gillespie of the Finnz

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Listen/Download – The Finnz – East Side Story

Greetings all.

Here’s a groovy – if slightly later than we’re used to – version of one of my favorite songs.

I have whipped Bob Seger and the Last Heard’s epic ‘East Side Story’ on you in various and sundry ways (ILRS, mixes, single tracks, covers) over the years.

Last year, whilst occupied rooting around on the web, I happened upon the record you see before you on a sales list, confirmed that it was the same song and purchased it forthwith.

When the disc fell through the mailslot and I had a chance to spin it all the way through, I was a happy camper indeed.

What you get here is all of the power of the OG – minus some fuzz – played in a 1982, new wavey (sorta) stylee by a Detroit-area group called the Finnz.

Led by singer Dennis Quinn, the Finnz released a pair of 45s in 1982, and even (fortunately for us) made an appearance playing this very song on Detroit TV.

The original East Side Story was a major regional hit, and it’s not hard to imagine why a Motor City band might want to bring it up to date with their own version.

Guitarist Robert Gillespie had played in a post-MC5 group with Rob Tyner (calling themselves the New MC5!?), and after the dissolution of the Finnz went on to a long association with none other than Mitch Ryder.

This is a very cool 45, and joins the list of fantastic covers of ‘East Side Story’ alongside the St Louis Union, Caretakers and others.

I hope you dig it, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #20

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Opener – Action Scene – Hawkshaw/Mansfield (KPM)
Spirit – I Got a Line On You (Ode)
Spirit – Taurus (Ode)
Spirit – Girl In Your Eye (Ode)
Spirit- Straight Arrow (Ode)
Spirit – Topanga Windows (Ode)
44th St Portable Flower Factory – Let’s Get Together (Scholastic)
44th St Portable Flower Factory – The Letter (Scholastic)
Esko Affair – Morning Dull Fire (Mercury)
Roy Buchanan – Down By the River (Atlantic)
Spirit – Clear LP Promo

Dave Dee Dozy Beaky Mick and Tich – Shame (Fontana)
Dave Dee Dozy Beaky Mick and Tich- You Make It Move (Fontana)
Bang Girl Group Revue – Drink In Hand (Psychedelphonic)
Bang Girl Group Revue – Love’s Gone Bad (Psychedelphonic)
Dino Desi and Billy – I’m a Fool (Reprise)
The Finnz – East Side Story (Finnz)
Heather Black – Bill The Black Militant (Double Bayou)
Kitchen Cinq – Determination (LHI)
Terry Knight and the Pack – Got Love (Lucky Eleven)
Gary Lewis and the Playboys – Heart Full of Soul (Liberty)
Gary Lewis and the Playboys – The Flake (Kelloggs Corn Flakes Ad)

The Critters – Mr Dieingly Sad (Kapp)
East Coast Left – My Child (Kapp)
Epic Splendor – It Could Be Wonderful (Hot Biscuit)
Giant Crab – Help Yourself (Uni)
Giant Crab – It’s Getting Harder (Uni)
Hourglass – Power Of Love (Liberty)
Music Machine – Some Other Drum (Original Sound)
Tom Northcott – Blackberry Way (Uni)
Peter Fonda – November Nights (Chisa)
The 10:15 – Joe’s Acclamation ()
Semicolons? – Beachcomber (Cameo/Parkway)
Poco – Hurry Up (Epic)
The Rockets – Hole In My Pocket (White Whale)
Neil Young – Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere LP Promo

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 20 – 184MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

I hope all is well in your part of the world.

It’s time once again for the Iron Leg Radio Show, episode 20!

This time around we start the show with a tribute to the late, great Ed Cassidy of Spirit, move on into some top shelf freakbeat and garage and finish up with a solid set of pop.

I hope you dig it all, and that you come back next week for the annual Year In Vintage Pop mix.

Until then…

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners

The Underdogs – Love’s Gone Bad b/w Mo Jo Hanna

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The Underdogs (and friends)

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Listen/Download – The Underdogs – Love’s Gone Bad

Listen/Download – The Underdogs – Mo Jo Hanna

Greetings all.

The Iron Leg has returned, hopefully for the long run.

It seems likely that for a while anyway, I’ll be sticking with one post a week augmented with the occasional Iron Leg Digital Trip mix, but at least I’ll be able to share some groovy stuff with you all.

An important note, I’ll be taking part in the Spindletop night with DJ Perry Lane next Monday night, beginning at 10PM at Botanica, 47 East Houston Street (between Mulberry and Mott) in New York City. They have a very groovy thing going there so come on down to soak up the Hammond 45s, soul jazz and other swinging sounds.

The tune I bring you today is – in it’s original form – a masterpiece of hard edged Motown, as performed and recorded by Chris Clark.

Not long after I scored my copy of that particular record, someone (I do not recall who) informed me that there was a garage band version of the track, which also appeared on the VIP label.

At the time I assumed that this was probably unspeakably rare and did not hold out hope that I might snag so scarce a beast, but as its appearance in this space today proves, things often work themselves out over the course of time.

The version I bring you today was recorded in 1966 by a Detroit area band called the Underdogs.

Interestingly, the Underdogs were the first band to record for the stories Motor City garage label Hideout Records (also home to Doug Brown and the Omens and the Pleasure Seekers among others).

Composed of Dave Whitehouse (bass, vocals), Chris Lena (guitar), Tony Roumell (lead guitar) and Michael Morgan (drums), the Underdogs, a popular local band were apparently the beneficiaries of a certain Mr. Berry Gordy’s plan to expand into other markets.

They had already recorded for Hideout when they went into the studio with Clarence Paul, aided by Earl Van Dyke on piano and James Jamerson on bass.

The first time I heard the Underdogs 45, I thought that the two sides came from two different sessions. This is in fact not the case, but the sound of the two songs is different.

‘Love’s Gone Bad’ is compared to the Chris Clark recording remarkably spare, and much more what you’d picture a 60s punk band sounding like (aside from Van Dyke’s piano backing).

The flip side, a rendering of Henry Lumpkin’s oft covered ‘Mojo Hannah’ (listed here as ‘Mo Jo Hanna’) has a much fuller, more ‘produced’ sound to it.

‘Love’s Gone Bad’ went on to be a fairly substantial Detroit area hit.

Apparently the Underdogs went into the studio a second time (with no less a light than Norman Whitfield!) and recorded a cover of the Temptations ‘The Way You Do the Things You Do’ which was unreleased at the time, but later appeared on Motown reissue comps.

The Underdogs were reported to record the original version of Bob Seger’s legendary ‘East Side Story’, but Seger decided to keep it for himself, and the rest is history.

That all said, ‘Love’s Gone Bad’ is yet another savage example that the good people of Detroit harbored a lot of snotty longhairs amongst their many legendary soul singers.

I hope you dig the tunes, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for a tasty Northern Soul 45.

Iron Leg Christmas Flashback – Bob Seger & the Last Heard

Greetings all.
The Yuletide is upon us, and to get things going I’m going to bring back last years Christmas post/track, followed on Monday with something new for the holiday season. I would have been more proactive but I suffered through a root canal this morning.
I hope you dig the track and I’ll see you all next week.
Peace
Larry

Originally posted December 2008

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Bob Seger (top left) & the Last Heard

Listen – Sock It To Me Santa – MP3

Greetings all.
I hope all is well on your end.
Today I bring you the very first Iron Leg Christmas post (hopefully the first of many).
Though this blog has a much smaller audience than Funky16Corners, I’m having a tremendous amount of fun working on it. Though soul and funk are the main focus of my collectors mania, my musical interests – accumulated over all my 45 years – are much broader.
As I’ve related in this space a bunch of times, during the mid-80’s I was pretty deeply involved in the garage/mod bag, both as an active (fanzines, bands) and passive (fan, collector) participant. It is the music I was digging through during that period (and before and after) that I cover here at Iron Leg.
One of the positive aspects of doing a music blog is that it kind of forces you to go back into your crates and dig, rediscovering and more importantly re-appreciating music that may not currently occupy the center stage. In that respect, Iron Leg definitely fits the bill.
If you’re a Funky16Corners reader, you’ll already know that I’ve never been a big collector of holiday music. Certainly someone that consumes music as voraciously as I do is bound to grab a couple of Christmas sides, but it has never been my focus.
I was originally going to post something quiet and meditative for Christmas, on account of that’s the kind of mood I find myself in these days.
However…
The bygone 60’s punk that still dwells within took over and I decided that we would all be better served with something from the kick-ass side of the menu.
In service of that notion, I bring you one of the punkiest Christmas records this side of the Sonics, Bob Seger & the Last Heard’s ‘Sock It To Me Santa’.
I’ve touched briefly on the dynamic pre-Night Moves career of Seger before (and will go even more in depth in the future). I don’t have the original 45 of this number (I ripped it from a 20 year old Euro bootleg of his Cameo 45s, but for those of you interested in the early Last Heard sides there are a few of them (including ‘Sock It To Me Santa’ on the recent Cameo-Parkway boxed set, which I believe is available via iTunes).
Here we see the 1966 model Seger, in which later pretensions to arena-rock-osity were preceded by just a touch of that Detroit suburban whiteboy James Brown wannabee-ism, which by the way predates a similar (though not Yuletide) sonic assault a year later by his fellow Motorcity rocker Mitch Ryder.
That all said, I ride for early Seger up through his Capitol years and ‘Sock It To Me Santa’ is a fine example.
I hope you dig it.
I have two more Iron Leg podcasts in the bag, as well as a large supply of individual bangers, so stick around kids. I won’t be posting again til up and around New Years Eve, so you all have yourselves an excellent holiday.
Peace
Larry

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Iron Leg Digital Trip #22 – Memories of a Not So Free Festival

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Iron Leg Digital Trip #22 – Memories of a Not So Free Festival
Grand Funk Railroad – Inside Looking Out (Capitol)
US Sound – Toady Frog Clan (Trump)
Steppenwolf – Tighten Up Your Wig (Dunhill)
Rod Stewart – Street Fighting Man (Mercury)
Three Dog Night – Feelin’ Alright (Dunhill)
Milwaukee Freak Scene – Land of Plastic (SSM)
Offenbach – Moody Calvaire Moody (Barclay)
Country Joe & The Fish – Rock and Soul Music (Cotillion)
Leslie West – This Wheel’s On Fire (Windfall)
Natural Gas – What Do You Want From My Life (Firebird)
Rationals – Barefootin’ (Crewe)
Humble Pie – I Don’t Need No Doctor (A&M)

You Can Hear This Mix in the Iron Leg Digital Trip Podcast Archive

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Not many people remember the Isle Royale Festival of Peace, especially not those that witnessed it firsthand.
It was the second annual rock festival to be held on the grounds of Isle Royale National Park, on an island in the middle of Lake Superior, a few short miles from the Canadian mainland.
That particular geographic fact is of little importance, until you realize that the very first Festival of Peace, held in August of 1970 was put on as what turned out to be a huge diversionary tactic by the publishers of a Duluth, Minnesota underground newspaper (Blown Wind). They had been informed, incorrectly as it turns out that Isle Royale was in fact within the borders of Canada – though the countless signs indicating that they were in a United States National Park should have been a tip off – and planned to send a busload of their compadres – draft resistors one and all – over the border to freedom.
As it was they all – the promoters included – ended up spending the next two years working in the prison laundry at Leavenworth.
No one is sure whose idea it was to bring the Festival of Peace back in 1971, nor why they did it in November. The first snows had fallen weeks before, and the grounds of the park, where the festival goers were expecting to camp, were, like the Wisconsin State Police, hard and unforgiving.
The line up of performers was surprisingly good, though in retrospect experts say this is more likely than not due to the fact that the US festival season was at a slow point, and there were a ton of bands hanging around with nothing to do. There are those who have surmised that had the Festival of Peace not come along, several major stars may have taken the opportunity to overdose, instead of participating in one of the signal debacles of rock and roll history.
Tickets to the festival were a surprisingly cheap fifteen dollars for all three days, which to the hordes of teenagers descending on the park seemed like a godsend. Unfortunately, the three-quarters of the performers who received little or no compensation for their work didn’t see it that way.
As the promoters from the first festival were in prison, their duties had been assumed by an ad hoc committee of Duluth’s underground, including the city’s last revolutionary, several members of the local motorcycle gang the Ape Hangers, and local AM radio personality Stash Wojchiehowicz who at the time was trying to reshape himself as a “progressive” (‘The Wojo with the Mojo’). What started out with the best of intentions went bad quickly, when the vast majority of pre-sale ticket revenues were diverted into the Ape Hangers’ beer fund, with little left over for hospitality, security or other expenses.
In the first volume of his autobiography, Humble Pie drummer Jerry Shirley remembered their shock when they arrived backstage only to discover that the specifics of their rider had been ignored and they – like all the other bands – had to survive on barrels of Kool-Aid and a huge, seemingly bottomless cauldron of (for the English) a strange dish that the locals described as “beans and weenies”.
Unfortunately for Humble Pie, and every other act at the Festival of Peace, unless they arrived in their own boat (which none of them – with the exception of the seafaring Mountain - were lucky enough to do), once they stepped off the helicopters, they were stuck there until the end of the three day period.
Friday morning November 10th, the lone park ranger on winter duty was surprised when he answered a knock in his door at 6AM, only to open the door and see a line of cars and pedestrians that stretched for miles. Though the promoters had in fact secured the proper permits, the park administrator had gone on vacation without passing along the information to his staff (that lone ranger).
Any sane person would have packed his car and run in the other direction, but Ranger Claude Westerveldt, following the model of farmer Max Yasgur two years before, decided that the kids had gotten a bad rap. Unfortunately he was wrong, and after the evening of Saturday, November 11th, he was never seen again, on the books as having abandoned his post, and widely assumed to either have gone over the border into the Ontario woods, or the victim of foul play.
In a tableaux reminiscent of the late night scenes at Altamont, the trucks carrying the stage, scaffolding and lights – after fighting their way through the traffic – managed to get to the festival site and set up by 2PM on the afternoon of the 10th. It was a few short hours later that the Grand Funk Railroad took the stage. Mark Farner had come in via Thunder Bay, and by the time the band plugged in he had consumed at least a case of Carling’s Black Label and was in rare form. The band played for the better part of two hours, performing their storming cover of the Animals ‘Inside Looking Out’. Years later, both Farner and Don Brewer both expressed wonder that they made it through the Festival at all.
The next band, the U.S. Sound were utterly obscure and unknown to everyone at the Festival, including the promoters, none of whom remembered booking them.
Steppenwolf took the stage around dusk, and played for the better part of the evening. They closed their set with the tune ‘Tighten Up Your Wig’, stolen almost note for note from the Junior Wells tune ‘Messin’ With the Kid’. Legend has it that Wells, who was set to play the following afternoon, heard the performance and was waiting for John Kay backstage where he greeted the unsuspecting singer with a cry of ‘Motherfucker!’ and proceeded to beat him senseless.
The fact that Rod Stewart was coming off a number one hit was apparently not taken into consideration, as he didn’t take the stage until almost midnight. When he did he was met with an ugly scene of forty thousand freezing fans, all huddling as close to possible to eleven trashcan fires. The beer had run out hours before and the audience had turned into a pulsing mass, interrupted by a floating fist-fight that seemed to pass back and forth at random, much the same as beach balls came to be used years later. The fact that Stewart opened his set with his cover of the Rolling Stones’ ‘Street Fighting Man’ only served to make things worse. It was the only song he played that night.
Midnight arrived as the crowd was returning to their tents and vans. There were reports that dozens of festival goers spent the night wandering the frigid beaches of the island looking for the hotel they’d read about, oblivious to the fact (as were the promoters) that t had burned down in 1947.
It didn’t help that the ferry to the mainland was on a winter schedule and stopped running after 5PM. Isle Royale had become, in 24 short hours, the largest city in Wisconsin, and a federally declared disaster area. There was little food, the supply of running water in the park was rusty and filled with bacteria (a problem that would test the park’s limited bathroom facilities the next day).
As the sun peeked up over the horizon the next morning, the hundreds of freezing hippies that had foolishly camped on the beach (it had been reported that some of them had tried to build rafts and float back to the mainland) awoke to the surreal sight of several dozen World War Two landing craft arriving on the beach, with hundreds of Wisconsin National Guardsmen – and tons of supplies – spilling out onto the beach.
There were rumors that an angry Tiny Tim (smelling of lavender) elbowed his way to the front of the line demanding C-rations, cigarettes and beer, but there are no (living) witnesses and this story is now generally understood (or hoped) to be apocryphal.
Either way, by mid-morning the National Guard had already treated most of the frostbite and exposure cases and State Commandant Earl Cressley had taken the stage to announce “breakfast in bed for all you stinking hippies.”
The crowd was too hungry and tired to be insulted – many of them were sure that they were in fact hallucinating – and proceeded to the newly erected tent city where they were greeted with steaming plated of cream chipped beef on toast (a completely alien dish to most of the crowd). Interestingly enough, this event was the impetus for the creation of Sunflower Leibowitz’ Cream Chipped Beef-a-torium, which has been a Sault Saint Marie landmark for the last 37 years.
Following breakfast, Three Dog Night took the stage and played for close to two hours. They were originally scheduled to close the festival, but once they arrived and surveyed the carnage they insisted that they be allowed to perform (and leave) in the morning.
They were followed by local Wisconsin band the Milwaukee Freak Scene, French Canadian heavies Offenbach, and Woodstock alums Mountain and Country Joe & the Fish.
The second evening came to a close with a set from another Canadian band, Natural Gas, working a maple syrup infused angle on the Blood Sweat and Tears vibe. Their set was cut short by a near riot as the Ape Hangers started beating everyone in sight when their bikes started to sink in the wet sand. Eventually they had to stop hitting people so that they could devote their energy to shoveling sand with their bare hands.
Ultimately they were unable to do anything, and as the tide came in the motorcycles sank deeper and deeper. The toughest bike club in Minnesota was shattered in one fell swoop as every single one of their bikes was swallowed by the beach at Isle Royale, where they have reappeared intermittently over the years, usually after a particularly strong storm.
There was a particularly telling photograph, published in a Look magazine article about the festival, in which the entire Ape Hangers club – all suddenly pedestrians – are huddled together in the corner of the Isle Royale ferry, shivering, glassy eyed and lost. Upon their return to the mainland, they discovered that news of their misfortune had preceded them, and their main rivals, the Visigoths club out of Minneapolis had swooped down on and ransacked their clubhouse. They were left with nothing, and those that didn’t return immediately to lives of petty crime were scattered to the four winds, though there are rumors that the club president resurfaced years later – with a new name and considerably shorter hair – as the Republican representative from a certain northern Minnesota congressional district.
The morning of the third and final day of the Isle Royale Festival of Peace looked like an instant replay tape of the final morning of Woodstock. The already sparse crowd had thinned considerably, the frozen ground was covered with garbage, abandoned sleeping bags and what were initially assumed to be corpses, but were in fact abandoned sleeping bags filled with frozen garbage.
There was some discussion about whether or not the festival would continue, but oddly enough the promoters weren’t involved, since they had vanished sometime after the conclusion of the previous day, along with all the money, the last two cases of beer and a duffel bag filled with beans and weenies.
Members of the Rationals and Humble Pie, who had spent the previous night huddled together for warmth decided that as long as the electricity was still on (and it was, provided by a single extension cord reaching into the park office), the festival would continue – and at the end of Humble Pie’s set – conclude, which (mercifully) it did.
What followed – at least as captured in photos in the rare coffee table book about the Festival of Peace, published in the 80s – resembled nothing less than a very hairy, acid drenched version of the WW2 evacuation of Dunkirk. Dozens of local boats, everything from fishing trawlers, to pleasure cruisers, to rowboats were pressed into service to transport the remaining festivalgoers, performers and their equipment back to the mainland.
In the two hour documentary film broadcast last year on Minnesota Public Television, several festival attendees, as well as performers like Leslie West, Peter Frampton and Danny Hutton of Three Dog Night were interviewed about the Isle Royale Festival of Peace. Not surprisingly, not a single person had fond memories of the experience, and West – who was apparently traumatized – could not recall it at all until placed under hypnosis by a psychiatrist.
The word last year was that there was a small movement afoot to erect a monument of some kind on the park grounds, but an unpleasant combination of lack of interest, and an angry letter from the National Park Service (in which they denied any knowledge that the festival had ever occurred) put an end to that.
The only sonic evidence of the fiasco – considered by those in the know to be the “Altamont of Wisconsin” – is a two LP bootleg, much of which appears in this mix.
As always, I hope you dig it, and that you raise a glass (or something else) to the memory of a not so free festival.

Peace

Larry

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some Hammond funk!

PSS Check out Paperback Rider, updated 2/18

The Rationals – Guitar Army

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The Rationals

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Listen – The Rationals – Guitar Army – MP3

Greetings all.

Another week has slipped away from us and the weekend looms large.
I don’t know about you cats, but I’ll be at the Asbury Lanes this Friday night whipping a little vintage funk and soul (in 45 form) on the gathered masses, and if you’re in the area, and feel like letting your hair (and maybe your pants) down, that is definitely the place to be.
If you can’t make it, or if the soulful sound is not the bag you’re in, allow me to drop something a little heavy – on the rock side of things – to get your weekend started.
The Rationals, who came up alongside the MC5 and the Stooges (yet were paradoxically the least successful of those groups, and certainly the least remembered) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, made some great music between 1963 and 1970, for a variety of local (A2, Genesis) and national (Cameo, Crewe) record labels.
Their sound was a mix of British Invasion inspired jangle (the incredible Beatley ‘Feelin’ Lost’) and white boy soul (they did a wicked cover of Eddie Holland’s ‘Leaving Here’).
By the end of the 60s, the freaky scene around them started to manifest itself in their sound (if only to a degree), and they had moved on to crafting ragged but right heaviosity that wouldn’t have sounded out of place alongside the chest beating of the MC5.
The freakiest/heaviest of their later period recordings is the song that gave Michigan activist John Sinclair the title for his memoir, ‘Guitar Army’.
The tune starts out with some muddy guitar riffing, before kicking into high gear, and a line that sound like a repudiation of their more radical scene mates:

“Some folks talkin’ bout
Burnin’ down
I ain’t talking bout
Burnin’ down
I’m just talking bout
Gettin’ down”

Wherein the Rationals seem to be running their freak flag about three quarters of the way up the pole, happy to rock the house where the MC5 might have wanted to go ahead and burn it the fuck down.
Forty years down the pike, this is all groovy (gravy) on account of no matter how righteous the Five, Sinclair and the rest of the White Panthers might have been then, people are in a much mellower place, though considering what we went through the last eight years, and the amount of grief the McCain Army were able to dole out concerning a certain member of the Weather Underground, maybe that’s not so cool.
But anyway…
No matter the politics behind the song, it’s a great, high energy rocker with some wild guitar from Steve Corell.
I also dig the weird, mellow little inter (outer) lude at the end of the tune.
I hope you dig it, and I’ll be back on Monday with something groovy.

Peace

Larry

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for Latin soul!

PSS Check out Paperback Rider, updated 2/18

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