Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #36

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Sunshine Company – Love That’s Where It Is (Imperial)
Candymen – Ways (ABC)
Tommy Roe – Aggravation (ABC)
Tommy Roe – Leave Her (ABC)
Chain Reaction – You Should Have Been Here Yesterday (Verve)
The Poor – My Mind Goes High (York)
The Turtles – She’s My Girl (White Whale)
Emmit Rhodes- Really Wanted You (ABC)
Rick Nelson – Don’t Make Promises (Decca)

British Walkers – I Found You (Try)
Changing Tymes – Free Spirit (She Comes On) (Bell)
Brian Hyland – The Joker Went Wild (Philips)
The Collage – Rainy Blue Day (Smash)
The Collage – Would You Like To Go (Smash)
Fun and Games – Elephant Candy (White Whale)
Fun and Games – The Grooviest Girl In the World (White Whale)
Jimmie Haskell – Prelude (ABC)
Jimmie Haskell/Denny Doherty – To Claudia On Thursday (ABC)
The Love Generation – The Love In Me (Imperial)

The Montanas – That’s When Happiness Began (WB)
Hondells – Just One More Chance (Columbia)
Coopers – Didn’t I (White Whale)
Nino Tempo and April Stevens with the Guilloteens – I Love How You Love Me (Atco)
Del Shannon – She (Liberty)
Cowsills – River Blue (MGM)
Eternity’s Children – Mrs Bluebird (Tower)
Chris and Peter Allen – Just Friends (Mercury)
Free Design – Kites Are Fun (Project 3)
Joyride – Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (World Pacific)
Van Dyke Parks – Come To the Sunshine (MGM)
Thom McCan Commercial

 

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 36 – 160MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

This month I was in the mood for some hooks and jangle, so I dipped into the archives and pulled out a bunch of groovy stuff. You get a grip of Curt Boettcher-associated material (songs, productions, arrangements), some soft pop, sunshine, bubblegum and even a bit of freakbeat.

Wait for a sunny day and play this one while you fly a kite (cuz kites are fun!).

See you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Brewer & Shipley – Truly Right / Time and Changes

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Michael Brewer and Tom Shipley

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Listen/Download – Brewer & Shipley – Truly Right

Listen/Download – Brewer & Shipley – Time and Changes

Greetings all.

The two tunes I bring you today can be filed as ‘familiar sounds from an unfamiliar source’.

Both of these songs are better known via their recording by other groups, but here they are presented by their authors, Michael Brewer and Tom Shipley.

Brewer and Shipley are themselves better known by their later recordings, like their 1971 hit ‘One Toke Over the Line’.

The two musicians had been bouncing around the LA scene in the mid-60s, writing and recording prior to their better known partnership.

They had composed (by themselves or as a pair) songs for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, the Byrds, Noel Harrison, the Poor, Glenn Yarbrough, HP Lovecraft and the Garden Club (basically a duet between Shipley and Ruthann Friedman).

I first heard ‘Truly Right’ on the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band’s 1967 ‘Ricochet’ LP which also featured a couple of very early songs written by Jackson Browne. It quickly became a favorite (the group’s first two LPs are lost classics of mid-60s LA) but it was a while before I figured out that the composers of the song were THE Brewer & Shipley.

That same year, the Poor, featuring a young Randy Meisner, would record Shipley’s song ‘She’s Got the Time (She’s Got the Changes)’, one of the finest bits of Sunset Strip popsike ever made.

Flash forward a few years and I find out that Brewer and Shipley recorded their own LP in 1968 entitled’Down In LA’ and that it included their versions of the two songs mentioned above.

The approach is much more relaxed/Laurel Canyon hippy than the harder edged pop of the NGDB and the Poor.

‘Truly Right’, which opens with acoustic guitar gains speed gradually, with the bass and drums coming in a bit at a time, until the whole band is moving along (with some groovy electric piano – courtesy of Leon Russell – running underneath). Brewer and Shipley lay down some very nice harmonies.

‘Time and Changes’ (truncated title, same song) is taken at a mellower, less popsike pace than the Poor’s version, but the overall effect is excellent. As much as I love the Poor 45, the Brewer and Shipley version has that late-60s, LA harmony vibe that reminds me of some of the cooler CSNY tracks.

If you can get your hands on the ‘Down In LA’ album, grab it because it expands on the vibe, working in a little bit of country rock, all the songs presented by B&S’s great harmonies.

Oddly, by the time ‘Down In LA’ was released, Brewer and Shipley had departed from the coast and relocated to Kansas City, MO.

They went on to have a hit with ‘One Toke Over the Line’ and its LP ‘Tarkio’ in 1971.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #33

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band – Zig Zag Wanderer (A&M
Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band – Abba Zabba (A&M)
Graham Bond Organisation – Harmonica (Gonks Go Beat Soundtrack)
Carnaby – Jump and Dance (Picadilly RE)
Cat Stevens – Baby Get Your Head Screwed On (Deram)
Paul and Barry Ryan – Keep It Out of Sight (MGM)
Paul and Barry Ryan – Hey Mr. Wiseman (Decca)
Paul and Barry Ryan – I Can’t Make Your Way (Decca)
Moody Blues Coke Commercial

The Joyride – The Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine (World Pacific)
The Joyride – The Crystal Ship (World Pacific)
The Joyride – Coming Soon (World Pacific)
The Joyride – Land of Rypap Papyr (World Pacific)
The Joyride – His Blues (World Pacific)
Living Legends – Monkey Don’t Care (RCA)
Paul Jones – It’s Getting Better (Bell)
Paul Jones – Not Before Time (Bell)
Brewer & Shipley – Truly Right (A&M)
Stone Ponies Pepsi Commercial

Everly Brothers – Man With Money (WB)
Everly Brothers – Walk Right Back (WB)
Everly Brothers – So Sad (To Watch Good Love Go Bad) (WB)
Phil Everly – The Air That I Breathe (RCA)
Tupper Saussy and the Wayward Bus – Love Hum (RCA)
Fairport Convention – I’ll Keep It With Mine (A&M)
Fairport Convention – Meet On the Ledge (A&M)
Fairport Convention – She Moves Through the Fair (A&M)
Fairport Convention – Tale In Hard Time (A&M)
JJ Cale – After Midnight (Liberty)
Cyrkle 7UP Commercial

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 33 – 181MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

We have some groovy new arrivals in the playlist this month, including some prime freakbeat, West Coast Sunshine Pop/Flower Power, pure pop, freakout, UK Folk Rock and a tribute to the late Phil Everly.

As always, I hope you dig it.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

Example


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Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #32

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw and Keith Mansfield – Action Scene(KPM)
Chesterfield Kings – She Told Me Lies (LP version) (Mirror)
Chesterfield Kings – Cry Your Eyes Out (Mirror)
Pandoras – Hot Generation (Voxx)
Smithereens – Got Me a Girl (Dirt)
Stomachmouths – R&B 65 (Got To Hurry)
The Scene – Stop-Go (Diamond)
Untold Fables – When the Night Falls (Dionysus)
Vipers – Nothing’s From Today (Jem/PVC)
Vipers – Never Alone (Midnight)
Vipers – You Don’t Believe Me (Midnight)

The Fuzztones – Bad News Travels Fast (Midnight)
The Fuzztones – We’re Pretty Quick (Midnight)
The Fuzztones – Gotta Get Some (ABC)
Green Telescope – Two By Two (Imaginary)
Hysteric Narcotics – Electric Children (RPM Mag Flexi)
Cynics – Painted My Heart (Dionysus)
Funseekers – It Should Be You (Susstones)
Original Sins – Come On Up (Chaos)
Royal Nonesuch – You Need Love (UP)
Telltale Hearts – It Came To Me (Voxx)

Boys From Nowhere – Beg (Young Lion)
Creeps – Rattlesnake Shake (Tracks On Wax)
Fleshtones – The World Has Changed (IRS)
Insomniacs – My Favorite Story (Umbrella)
Lyres – How Do You Know (New Rose)
Plasticland – Go a Go Go Time (Enigma)
Plasticland – The Windowsills (Enigma)
Plasticland – Rattail Comb (Scadillac)
Secret Syde – Hole In My Pocket (Mutha)
Spectors – I Fell In Love (Get Hip)
Stems – Make You Mine (Citadel)
Stems – Under Your Mushroom (Citadel)

The Bangs – No Mag Commercial (Ear Movie)
The Bangles – The Real World (IRS)
The Bangles – The Hero Takes a Fall (Columbia)
The Rain Parade – This Can’t Be Today (Restless)
The Rain Parade – Prisoners (Enigma)
The Eyes of Mind – Yesterday Is Gone (Voxx)
Mad Violets – Psilocybe (Voxx)
Lord John – Westminiature Abbey (Bomp)
Mod Fun – I Am With You (New)
Mod Fun – Grounded (Cryptovision)
Phantom Five – She’s Not (Making Tyme)

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 32 – 256MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have a very special edition of the show lined up for you this month.

Though I have included some garage/psych revival tracks over the course of the previous 31 episode of the podcast, I have always wanted to dig out a big stack of 80s (and some early 90s) vinyl, digimatize it and devote an episode to the sounds of my misspent youth.

So I did (finally).

Though it is by no means comprehensive, it is a good look at the kind of stuff my friends and I were digging during the first wave of the garage/psych/mod revival in the the early to mid 80s.

There’s a bunch of American stuff (both coasts and the middle) as well as the UK, Europe and Scandinavia represented.

There are even a couple of really rare things in the mix for the trainspotters in the crowd.

You get almost two and a half hours of sounds!

As always, I hope you dig it.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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RIP Dick Dodd of the Standells

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Dick Dodd 1945 – 2013

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The Standells

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Listen/Download – The Standells – Little Sally Tease

Listen/Download – The Standells – Why Did You Hurt Me

Listen/Download – The Standells – Dirty Water

Listen/Download – The Standells – Medication

NOTE: Word came down this weekend that Standells drummer/vocalist (and former Mousketeer!) Dick Dodd had passed away at the age of 68 after a battle with cancer. The Standells were one of the great garage bands of the 60s and a huge influence on the 80s garage revival.

I’m reposting an article that originally ran here in 2009, and adding in a couple of other songs that have run in this space before (and one that hasn’t), all classics.

I hope you dig the sounds and raise a glass to the memory of a very groovy cat.

Peace

Larry

PS – Dig the Standells on ‘The Munsters’ (en Espanol!)

PSS – And in Riot On Sunset Strip

>>Originally Posted November, 2009

Greetings all.

I hope all is well on your end as another week comes to a close.

The daylight savings time thing has come to an end, and this year (as opposed to all those in the past that I can still remember with any clarity) it doesn’t seem to be causing me any trouble. Usually I find my self dragging my ass around for at least a week as I pull myself into synch with the clock.

I’m putting this post up a little early since the fam and I are hitting the road for a couple of days of R&R.
The tune I bring you today has been a favorite since back in the garage revival days of yore. Back then, next to the Chocolate Watchband, the Standells loomed over the mid-60s like some kind of garage punk colossus, having created several anthemic tunes and having the added benefit of having recorded for a major label and having their moving image captured on film a number of times.

Though for most garage heads the go-to Standells numbers are ‘Sometimes Good Guys Don’t Wear White’ and the Nuggets-y ‘Dirty Water’, my faves by the LA combo have always been lesser known killers like ‘Why Did You Hurt Me’ and today’s selection, their ramped up cover of Don and the Goodtimes PNW classic ‘Little Sally Tease’.

Originally waxed by D&the GTs, then later covered by the Kingsmen, ‘Little Sally Tease’ is one of those stompers that seems as if it were created in the lab of a mop-topped mad scientist attempting to formulate the perfect garage punk record, having exhumed and stitched together pounding drums, throbbing combo organ, fuzz guitar and snotty adolescent girl trouble lyrics of the first order.

The original version of the song is no small potatoes, but the Standells took it into the studio and beat it like a rented mule until every single drop of snot and bad attitude was placed on display like a hood ornament on their own high powered muscle car. Things get off to a strong start with heavy bass and witch doctor drums, but it isn’t until the chorus, shredded guitar solo and combo organ workout that things reach a truly explosive climax.

‘Little Sally Tease’ is a cut on the 1966 LP ‘Dirty Water’ which may pack more garage punk power than any full length in the history of the genre. Alongside the title cut, ‘..Good Guys’, ‘Medication’, ‘Little Sally Tease’ and ‘Why Did You Hurt Me’, you also get slamming covers of ‘19th Nervous Breakdown’ and ‘Hey Joe’, as well as the cover photo of the Standells looking positively badass.

It’s just that heavy.

As your physician I recommend you get this on a CD (or patch the MP3 thingy into the car radio) and drive around with the stereo at full blast and the windows wide open. No sense in hiding the fact that you’re a fuzz addled freak from the rest of the neighborhood, is there? Hmmmm?

Dig it and I’ll see you all on Monday.

Peace

Larry<<

 

Example

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Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #31

Example

Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Opener – Action Scene – Keith Mansfield/Alan Hawkshaw (KPM)
Colour Field – Can’t Get Enough of You Baby (Chrysalis)
Game Theory – 24 (Enigma)
Smithereens – I Don’t Want To Lose You (Enigma)
Neats – Six (Propellor)
Neats – Red and Gray (Ace of Hearts)
Biff Bang Pow – There Must Be a Better Place (Creation)
Dentists – I’m Not the Devil (Homestead)

The Animals – I’m Gonna Change the World (MGM)
Motifs – If I Gave You Love (Selsom)
Ascots – Sookie Sookie (Super)
The Dillons – Simple Way of Living (Impression)
Nashville Teens – Find My Way Back Home (London)
Spats – She Done Moved (ABC)
Ian and the Zodiacs – Why Can’t It Be Me (Philips)
Freddy Cannon – Cincinnatti Woman (WB)
Freddy Cannon Radio Spot

Lovin’ Spoonful – Six O’Clock (Kama Sutra)
Carson and Gaile – Something Stupid (Kapp)
Biff Rose – What’s Gnawing at Me (Tetragrammaton)
The Daily Flash – The French Girl (UNI)
BJ and the Profits – It’s Gonna Rain (Uptown)
Friday Brown – The Outdoor Seminar (RCA)
The Lamp of Childhood – Two O’Clock Morning (Dunhill)
The Lamp of Childhood – You Can’t Blame Me (Dunhill)
The London Knights – Go To Him (Mike)
Thorinshield – One Girl (Philips)
Real Don Steele Pepsi Ad

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 31 – 134MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have a groovy one lined up for you this month.

We get things started with a set of 80s bands on a 60s tip, move on to a set of harder edged US garage and British beat,and finish things up with some pop, folk rock and psych.

So pull down the ones and zeros, slide them onto your MP3 delivery device, and slide them into your head.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band – Diddy Wah Diddy b/w Who Do You Think You’re Fooling

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Captain Beefheart (2nd from right) and the Magic Band circa 1966

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Listen/Download – Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band – Diddy Wah Diddy

Listen/Download – Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band – Who Do You Think You’re Fooling

Greetings all.

I have something very special for you today.

Captain Beefheart has always been something of a mystery to me (and a whole lot of other folks, too).

For most of my adult life, the good Captain was but a cipher to me, known only as the wild, mysterious musical being responsible for that album with the fish on it (Trout Mask Replica).

I didn’t know his music, nor did I know anyone who did.

There were some Zappa devotees in my orbit, who might have been acquainted with Beefheart’s more challenging sounds via their close association but none of them ever shared any of it.

The first actual Beefheart I heard, was the deranged and amazing ‘Abba Zabba’, which had been included on an import psych comp I picked up in the late 80s.

That piqued my curiousity, which made me seek out his 1967 LP ‘Safe As Milk’.

It was there that I had my skull split open by the mighty ‘Zig Zag Wanderer’, and thusly dipped my toe, ever so gently into the Beefheartian universe.

I made the requisite run at ‘Trout Mask Replica’, and was unable to breach its weirdness, but have since tunneled my way in a bit, working my way through some of his more approachable stuff, hoping that someday the molten core of his art would reveal itself to me.

I didn’t realize that Beefheart had ever done anything truly “conventional” until someone played his version of the old Bo Diddley classic ‘Diddy Wah Diddy’ for me.

That Beefheart and an early incarnation of the Magic Band had recorded actual, bluesy garage rock (with David Gates producing, no less!!) was at first stunning. Eventually I was able to see/hear how this 45 – recorded in 1966 – was a logical first chapter in the Captain Beefheart story.

The touchstone for me – with Beefheart – has always been the sound of Howling Wolf, someone who the good Captain had clearly digested fully.

Of course what Beefheart did with that sound, i.e. spit it back out like some kind of cubist mindfuck, like Rahsaan Roland Kirk and the Monks having a drunken battle of the bands in a back alley somewhere, was something else entirely.

Much like the Mothers of Invention on ‘Freak Out’, Captain Beefheart’s sound on ‘Diddy Wah Diddy’ is the sound of a sonic maverick with one foot in conventional pop and the other on a psychotic banana peel. While this is much more evident on ‘Safe As Milk’, there is no denying that it is here as well.

The sound of ‘Diddy Wah Diddy’ is rooted in the UK R&B of the day, yet if you listen closely it also sounds like a busload of mental patients rolling down a hill playing tubas (dig that morbidly obese fuzz bass).

There’s enough 66-era skronk, and the harmonica, to tie it into the SoCal garage thing, but if you had any idea of the journey that Beefheart was about to embark on, it’s not hard to see it take root here.

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The Cap’n amongst a star-studded line up in Hollywood

The flipside, ‘Who Do You Think You’re Fooling’ (credited on the label to ‘Don Vliet’ before he added the ‘Van’) is even a little bit more mainstream than the A-side, and is very groovy indeed.

Beefheart and the Magic band recorded one more 45 for A&M, featuring the David Gates-penned ‘Moonchild’.

You should take a gander at Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band working it out 1966 style on ‘Where the Action Is’.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Nino Tempo & April Stevens with the Guilloteens – I Love How You Love Me

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Nino Tempo and April Stevens

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Nino and April on Shivaree, with bagpipes and the T-Bones…

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Listen/Download – Nino Tempo & April Stevens with the Guilloteens

Greetings all.

Ready to have your minds blown?

A couple of years back I grabbed the most excellent Rhino ‘Where the Action Is’ set.

There was a lot on there that I’d heard (or already had on vinyl) but there was also a grip of absolutely incredible stuff that was new to me.

Among the tracks that really knocked me back on my heels, was the record you see before you today, ‘I Love How You Love Me’ by Nino Tempo and April Stevens.

I was already a fan of their work, especially their biggest hit, ‘Deep Purple’ (long a fave of mine) but I had no inkling they had anything as game changing as this up their sleeves.

There was probably a gap of a few years between when I first heard – and fell in love with – the track and when I finally scored the 45.

When that hot little biscuit finally fell through the mail slot, I had my mind blown all over again.

Rhino set the standards for quality reissues, and the annotation is generally second to none, but the notes in the box set missed a something very interesting in regard to this record.

As you’ll see when you look at the label, the notes to ‘Where the Action Is’ omitted one crucial detail, that being that the band on the record (credited right there on the label) was none other that the mighty Guilloteens!

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The Guilloteens on Shebang with Casey Kasem

Hailing from Memphis, bit having settled in LA for their recording career, the Guilloteens (billed on the 45 as the ‘Guilloteenes’) waxed some incredible 45s for HBR and Columbia, especially the savage ‘Hey You’.

Though he is best known for his performing partnership with his sister, Nino Tempo was also an early associate/acolyte of Phil Spector’s. I have no doubt that his time in the studio with Spector had an influence on this record.

The word that comes to mind when I think about this record is ‘inspired’.

How Tempo decided to take the Paris Sisters 1961 hit and toss it into the blender with 1965 folk rock and a fucking set of bagpipes (?!?!), and managed to alchemically take all that incongruity and convert it into just over two and a half minutes of magic is one of the truly remarkable (if obscure) achievements of mid-60s pop.

There’s just no reason any of this should work, but no matter how many times I listen to this record (and it’s up in the hundreds now) it just keeps sounding better and better.

The Paris Sisters original was (surprise!) a Phil Spector production. Despite having a melody that at first listen seems syrupy, the record has a cavernous, hypnotic sound.

Tempo’s treatment of the tune, re-casting it in a Byrds-y jangle is stunning. He tears the song from its somnambulistic origins, gives it an au-go-go tempo, and even tosses in a little bit of fuzz guitar for the longhairs in the crowd.

But then, there’s the bagpipes.

I can almost see Tempo, like a bug-eyed mad scientist huddled behind a rack of bubbling test tubes having a eureka moment and pulling a Scotsman out of a sack.

There’s not a single, logical path from ‘I’ll Feel a Whole Lot Better’ to ‘Loch Lomond’, yet the addition of the bagpipes – which Tempo has said were inspired by the modal guitar sound of the Byrds – is pure genius.

Interestingly, Nino and April’s ‘I Love How You Love Me’ went Top 40 in a number of regional markets, and a year later Paul and Barry Ryan copied the arrangement and had a Top 20 hit with the song in the UK.

It’s a great, great record and one you ought to download and push on your friends as a public service.

I hope you dig it, and I’ll see you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #30

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw/Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Mindbenders – The Morning After (Fontana)
The Remains – Once Before (Epic)
The Remains – Diddy Wah Diddy (Epic)
Sir Raleigh and the Coupons – Tomorrow’s Gonna Be Another Day (Jerden)
Del Shannon – She (Liberty)
Carole King – Pleasant Valley Sunday (Demo)
Scotty McKay – All Around the World (Claridge)
Baker Knight and the Knightmares – Hallucinations (Reprise)
The Enemys – Mojo Woman (MGM)
Freddy Cannon – 20th Century Fox (WB)
Moody Blues – Fly Me High (London)
Moody Blues Concert Promo


Nilsson – The Path That Leads To Trouble (Tower)
Nilsson – Good Times (Tower)
Nilsson – So You Think You’ve Got Troubles (Tower)
Nilsson – Growin’ Up (Tower)
Nilsson – Signs (demo)
Nilsson – This Could Be The Night (demo)
Monkees – Daddy’s Song (Head OST)
Glen Campbell – Without Her (Capitol)
Bobby Vee – One (Liberty)
Ella Fitzgerald – Open Your Window (Reprise)
Nilsson – Ban Roll On Commercial

Paul Williams – Nilsson Sings Newman (A&M)*
Puppet – Best Friend (Date)
Nilsson – Everybody’s Talkin’ (Aerial Pandemonium Ballet Remix) (RCA)
Nilsson – Mr Richland’s Favorite Song (Aerial Pandemonium Ballet Remix) (RCA)
Nilsson – Mourning Glory Story (RCA)
Nilsson – Mother Nature’s Son (RCA)
Nilsson – Puppy Song (RCA)
George Tipton – Rainmaker (WB)
George Tipton – Maybe (WB)
Davy Jones – Are You Sleeping (The Point UK Cast OST – MCA)
Mickey Dolenz – He’s Leaving (The Point UK Cast OST – MCA)
Pat Williams – Don’t Leave Me (Verve)
Lena Horne – Think About Your Troubles (Buddah)
Harry Nilsson – Handgun Violence PSA

DMZ – Out of Our Tree (Sire)
Paul Raven – Soul Thing (MCA UK)
The Paupers – Numbers (Verve)
Mars Bonfire – Ride With Me (UNI)
Joe South – Hush (Capitol)
Lamp Of Childhood – Two O’Clock In the Morning (Dunhill)
Bodine – Disaster (MGM)
KHJ Tiny Tim Concert Promo

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 30 – 247MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have a very special (very long) episode of the show for you this month.

Sandwiched between two sets of garage, freakbeat and psych you get a long tribute to all things Nilsson, featuring some rarities by the man himself, as well as a far reaching assortment of covers by everyone from Glen Campbell to Ella Fitzgerald and Lena Horne.

I think this is an especially cool one, so pull down the ones and zeros and dig it!

See you all next week with some more coolness.

Peace

Larry

*NOTE: After I recorded the show I found a piece by Paul Williams addressing his song ‘Nilsson Sings Newman’, and his relationship with Nilsson directly. It’s worth reading.

 

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Van Dyke Parks – Come To the Sunshine

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Van Dyke Parks

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Listen/Download – Van Dyke Parks – Come to the Sunshine

Listen/Download – Van Dyke Parks – Farther Along

Greetings all.

I have something very special to share with you today.

As has been written in ths space before, I am a big fan of Van Dyke Parks, as an artist and in his capacity as a arranger/muse/facilitator for other artists.

Parks is best known for his collaboration with Brian Wilson on the ‘Smile’ LP, in both its aborted beginnings and it’s coming to fruition decades later.

During the 1960s he worked with Wilson and the Beach Boys, Randy Newman, Nilsson, Ruthann Friedman, Phil Ochs, Tim Buckley and many more.

The term ‘Americana’ has come over the years to represent a dose of rural/country sounds in music, but with Parks it means something much bigger.

While he is best known for his contributions to 60s and 70s pop, and he worked well within the stylistic framework of that era, he also brought with him the sounds of popular music, beginning with the days of Stephen Foster and moving on up through ragtime, Tin Pan Alley and into the years of vinyl.

That said, he always managed to imbue his music with a contemporary sound, and as I wrote when I posted tracks from his most famous album ‘Song Cycle’:

“It is psychedelic, but in a way that opens and expands the mind – via the ears – in ways outside of the standard operating procedure, and one must be immersed, and allowed to soak in its wonders before all is revealed.”

While it seems – in hindsight – a remarkable achievement I am of the opinion that it was this quality that kept Parks on the exotic end of the menu throughout his long career.

It is possible that time will show that Parks importance lay in his work as a partner/facilitator, but that would be a shame, considering how good his own work is.

I can’t be sure where the song ‘Come to the Sunshine’ first entered my ears. It’s likely that I read about the Harpers Bizarre hit (Top 40 6/67) but I don’t think I actually heard the song until I picked up a 45 with a version of it by a country/pop singer named Roberta Lee (with a Link Wray cover on the flip).

Lee’s version stripped some of the wonder out of the song, making it sound like a Florida Department of tourism commercial.

I finally encountered Van Dyke Parks’ original version (albeit a badly mixed/mastered one) on a late-60s MGM sampler called ‘The Core of Rock’.

It wasn’t until the Rhino ‘Where the Action Is’ box set that I finally heard a nice, clear take on Parks recording.

Not long after that, I set out in search of the 45, which took the better part of a year.

That 45, recorded in 1966 by Parks, and featuring a dense, heavily layered arrangement, is a sunny, yet complex pop experience.

The record doesn’t really evoke a specific sound (you get alternating strata of piano, mandolin and rhythm section, all with Parks’ high tenor running over it) aiming more at a mood of sunny (what else?) optimism.

He even manages to namecheck his father’s dance band (the White Swan Serenaders) in the lyrics!

Interestingly, for all the layers, the record was apparently recorded in three takes on a single day.

The Harpers Bizarre version of ‘Come To the Sunshine’ (which features VDP in keyboards) brings some of the hazier parts of Parks recording into sharp focus, which is not necessarily a good thing, since the end result is a good deal slicker than the original.

The flipside of ‘Come to the Sunshine’ is a fairly straight reading of the country gospel tune ‘Farther Along’, which was also recorded by the Byrds a few years later on the album of the same name.

‘Come to the Sunshine’ was also covered by the Marketts, the Pleasure Fair, and a UK group called the Chuckles.

I hope you dig the sounds, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

Example


PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

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