Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #44

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Alan Hawkshaw and Keith Mansfield – Action Scene (KPM)
Small Face – All Or Nothing (RCA)
Small Faces – Understanding (RCA)
Small Faces – Tin Soldier (Immediate)
Small Faces – I Feel Much Better (Immediate)
Small Faces – Afterglow of Our Love (Immediate)
Small Faces – Wham Bam Thank You Man (Immediate)
Faces – Oh Lord I’m Browned Off (WB)
Faces – I Know I’m Losing You (Live on BBC Saturday Club)
There Are But Four Small Faces Promo

Asylum Choir- Icicle Star Tree (Smash)
Asylum Choir – Episode Containing Three Songs (NY OP/Land of Dog/Mr Henri the Clown) (Smash)
Asylum Choir – Death of the Flowers (Smash)
Asylum Choir – Indian Style (Smash)
Leon Russell – Delta Lady (Shelter)
Leon Russell – Prince of Peace (Shelter)
Leon Russell and the Shelter People – Of Thee I Sing (Shelter)
Leon Russell and the Shelter People – Beware of Darkness (Shelter)
Leon Russell and the Shelter People – Crystal Closet Queen (Shelter)

Gene Pitney – Heartbreaker (Musicor)
Billy Joe Royal – Hush (Columbia)
Beverley – Where the Good Times Are (Deram)
The Cast of Thousands – Cast’s Blues (Amy)
Kaleidoscope – Elevator Man (Epic)
Russell Morris – The Real Thing Pts1&2 (Diamond)
Houstons – Sea of Tranquility (World Pacific)
Houstons – Solar Light (World Pacific)
Strawbs – Or Am I Dreaming (A&M)
Fleetwood Mac – Albatross (Epic)

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #44 – 207MB/256kbps

 

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have an extra groovy (extra long) episode for you this month, starting out with a tribute to the late Ian McLagan, then on to a set of late 60s/early 70s Leon Russell (with Asylum Choir and the Shelter People) and then closing things out with a bunch of recent arrivals and greats from the crates.

As always I hope you dig it, and that you all have an extra Merry Christmas.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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Hal Blaine (The Drummer Man) and the Young Cougars – Challenger II

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Hal Blaine

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Listen/Download – Hal Blaine (the Drummer Man) and the Young Cougars – Challenger II

Greetings all.

Here’s a groovy one pulled straight from the annals of chance encounters.

I was on the prowl for a certain 45 – (the original recording of ‘I’m Into Somethin’ Good’ by Earl-Jean) and found it sitting in the midst of a ‘lot’ of 45s.

The whole megillah only cost seven dollars, so I thought it worth the risk and pulled the trigger.

About a week later, the package falls through the mailslot, and alongside Earl-Jean (which was, as it turns out, in excellent condition) I got a couple of other groovy discs, including last week’s Strawbs 45 , and the disc you see before you today.

I have never been a connoisseur of ‘hot rod’ 45s, but I am certainly not averse to the potent mixture of fuzz, reverb and novelty.

The record in question – Hal Blaine (the Drummer Man) and the Young Cougars ‘Challenger II’ – is a particularly cool example of the genre.

Written by none other than Lee Hazlewood, and played by Blaine and his Wrecking Crew buddies, like Glenn Campbell, Leon Russell, Carol Kaye and Billy Strange, ‘Challenger II’ mixes a fuzz guitar lead with vibes and (of course) Blaine’s pounding drums.

The flipside, ‘Gear Stripper’ was written by David Gates (who arranged the LP), years before he morphed into a slice of Bread.

The tracks were included on the LP ‘Deuces, T’s, Roadsters and Drums’ released in 1963.

I hope you dig the track, and I’ll see you all next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #28

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Action Scene – Hawkshaw/Mansfield (KPM)
Los Bravos – Going Nowhere (Press)
Thors Hammer – Show Me You Like Me (Columbia)
Moody Blues – This Is My House (London)
The Herd – Understand Me (Fontana)
The Fortunes – Fire Brigade (UA)
Easybeats – Made My Bed Gonna Lie In It (UA)
Donovan – Museum (Epic)
Yardbirds – Little Games (Epic)
Yardbirds – Great Shakes Commercial

The Poor – She Got the Time (York)
The Poor – Come Back Baby (Decca)
The Poor – Feelin’ Down (Decca)
The Poor – Knowing You Knowing Me (York)
The Poor – My Mind Goes High (York)
The Collection – Tomorrow Is a Window (Hot Biscuit Disc Company)
The Collection – Both Sides Now (Hot Biscuit Disc Company)
Guild Light Gauge – Cloudy (We Make Rock’n’Roll Records)
Guild Light Gauge – 14th Annual Fun and Pleasure Fair (We Make Rock’n’Roll Records)
Crib and Ben – Emily (Decca)
Derek See – She Came This Way (Psychedelphonic)
Paul Revere and the Raiders – Louie Go Home (Columbia)
Paul Revere and the Raiders Greatest Hits Commercial

Eric Anderson – Violets of Dawn (Vanguard)
Fred Neil – The Other Side of This Life (Elektra)
Gordon Lightfoot – The Pride of Man (UA)
Ruthann Friedman – Fairy PrinceRainbow Man (Reprise)
Ruthann Friedman – Morning Becomes You (Reprise)
Ruthann Friedman – Piper’s Call (Reprise)
Claudine Longet – Jealous Guy/Don’t Let Me Down (Barnaby)
David McWilliams – The Days of Pearly Spencer (Kapp)
Hearts and Flowers – Please (Capitol)
JJ Cale – It’s a Go Go Place (Liberty)

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 28 – 185MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

Welcome to this month’s episode of the Iron Leg Radio Show.

I have some cool stuff for you this month, including a grip of freakbeat, the sounds of The Poor, a look at Eddie Simon’s brief recording career and some very groovy folky stuff .

I hope you dig it.

See you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners

JJ Cale – It’s a Go Go Place

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JJ Cale

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Listen/Download – JJ Cale – It’s a Go Go Place

Greetings all.

I hope the new week finds you well.

Late last week, word came down that the great JJ Cale had slipped the surly bonds of earth at the age of 74.

Cale who is best known for other performer’s version of the songs he wrote, actually had a long and productive recording career of his own.

Though I never ventured too deeply into his catalog, his history was of endless interest to me because of his connection to the Tulsa Sound, and through that to one of my all-time favorites, Leon Russell.

The 1960s saw a serious migration from Oklahoma to Los Angeles, led by folks like Russell, Cale, Elvin Bishop and David Gates, as well as supporting players like Jesse Ed Davis, Carl Radle, Jim Keltner and Greg Dempsey.

As I mentioned, Cale’s songs are often better known that he was (especially considering how many people thought he and Welsh Velvet Underground member John Cale were one and the same), with classics like ‘After Midnight’ and ‘Cocaine’ (Eric Clapton), ‘Call Me the Breeze’ (Lynryd Skynyrd) the most famous.

Though he didn’t record his first LP until 1972, he had been recording 45s since 1958 (first, as Johnny Cale), including a trio of singles for Liberty in 1965 and 1966.

The tune I bring you today was the flip side of his first Liberty 45, the Roger Miller-esque novelty ‘Dick Tracy’.

‘It’s a Go Go Place’, co-written by Cale and Russell, and produced by Russell and Snuff Garrett, is a very groovy little ode to the Sunset Strip with a bluesy shuffle and a cool guitar solo (sounding a little like Albert Collins).

Cale’s vocal has that Oklahoma twang and I have to assume that Russell is playing on there somewhere.

The following year would see Cale record the original version of ‘After Midnight’ for Liberty.

Cale’s Liberty 45s are fairly hard to come by and I don’t know that they’ve ever been comped, so dig the sounds and I’ll see you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

The Spotlights – Batman and Robin b/w Dayflower

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The Caped Crusaders

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Lou Courtney, Leon Russell and Snuff Garrett

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Listen/Download – The Spotlights – Batman and Robin

Listen/Download – The Spotlights – Dayflower

Greetings all.

Welcome back to the Iron Leg experience.

I hope you all had a chance to download and listen to last week’s edition of the Iron Leg Radio Show. If not, pull down the ones and zeros and give it a listen. I think you’ll dig it.

The tune I have for you today is not only very groovy on its own sonic merits, but carries with it the traces of a very interesting back story.

When I was digging at the Allentown all-45 show a while back, I pulled ‘Batman and Robin’ out ofa box of mixed genre 45s, and due to my own fascination with 1966-era, pop art Batman and any musical manifestation thereof, I grabbed it.

It was only when I got home and took a closer look at the label that I realized that the disc might have a more interesting pedigree than I figured.

The writing of the song is credited to Leon Russell and Snuff Garrett (who were working together frequently in the mid-60s, most prominently on Gary Lewis and the Playboys stuff), but also to a certain ‘L. Pegues’.

Now, to most people that name will mean little to nothing, but to dedicated soul collectors like myself, it rings an especially interesting bell.

That is on account of the fact that Louis Pegues was the given name of soul giant Lou Courtney, who in addition to making a grip of amazing records under his assumed name, also worked extensively as a songwriter and producer.

He wrote songs (first with his composing partner Dennis Lambert) for acts like Freddie and the Dreamers, Leslie Gore and the Nashville Teens, and later (with Bob Bateman) wrote for soul artists like Mary Wells, Lorraine Ellison, the Webs and Henry Lumpkin (among many others).

Though I don’t know the specific circumstances of his artistic intersection with Leon Russell, my first instinct is to attribute it to Leon’s ubiquity in the studios of Los Angeles in the 1960s.

The tune, ‘Batman and Robin’ (released in 1966) is a first rate slice of garagey novelty with pounding piano and organ, comic-book specific lyrics and Leon (I’m pretty sure) on lead vocals.

The flipside is a very cool and extremely unusual instrumental called ‘Dayflower’, in which the band performs a mash-up of the Beatles ‘Day Tripper’ and the old bluegrass standard ‘Wildwood Flower’.

There was also a full LP by the Spotlights (all comic-related titles) which I’ve never seen, and one other 45 with tracks from the LP (‘Dayflower’ was 45-only).

If any of you has any more specific info on the Spotlights, please add on in the comments.

I hop you dig it and I’ll see you next week.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some soul.

Iron Leg Radio Show Episode #18

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Beep beep beep beep…..

Playlist

Intro – Action Scene – Hawkshaw/Mansfield (KPM)
Joe South – Hush (Capitol)
Joe South – Games People Play (Capitol)
Joe South – I Knew You When (Capitol)
Joe South – Yo Yo (Capitol)
Joe South – Mirror of Your Mind (Capitol)
Joe South – A Million Miles Away (Capitol)
Gallenkamps Shoe Ad

Equals – Black Skin Blue Eyed Boys (Shout)
Chain Reaction – Ever Lovin’ Man (Verve)
Chain Reaction – You Should Have Been Here Yesterday (Verve)
The Knack – Banana Man (Capitol)
The Knack – Pretty Daisy (Capitol)
Spotlights – Batman and Robin (Smash)
Spotlights – Dayflower (Smash)
Montanas – That’s When Happiness Began (WB)
Playboys of Edinburgh – Mickey’s Monkey (Columbia)
Houston Post Now Sounds Groove In Ad

Ohio Express – Beg Borrow and Steal (Cameo Parkway)
Other Side – Walking Down the Road (Brent)
Other Side – Streetcar (Brent)
What-Knots – I Ain’t Dead Yet (Dial)
The Lamp Of Childhood – Season of the Witch (Dunhill)
The Lamp Of Childhood – First Time Last Time (Dunhill)
The Lamp of Childhood – Two O’Clock Morning (Dunhill)
The Lamp of Childhood – You Can’t Blame Me (Dunhill)
Connie Francis – Fallin’ (MGM)
The Velvet Underground – Who Loves the Sun (Cotillion)
L.U.V. Movie Ad

Listen/Download -Iron Leg Radio Show Episode 18 – 150MB/256kbps

Greetings all.

I hope the new week finds you well.

It’s time once again for the Iron Leg Radio Show, our eighteenth episode!

This month’s show is – thanks to a very fruitful day at the Allentown All-45 record Show – packed with recent acquisitions.

This time out we start with a tribute to Joe South, moving on to lots of excellent garage, folk rock , sunshine pop and as always a few wild cards.

I hope you dig it, and I’ll be back next week with something groovy.

Peace

Larry

 

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners

Asylum Choir – Welcome To Hollywood

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Asylum Choir – Marc Benno and Leon Russell

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Listen – Asylum Choir – Welcome to Hollywood – MP3

Greetings all.

I hope the dawning of both a new week and new year find you all well.
I spent New Years Eve amongst with my wife, kids and in-laws up in frosty upstate New York, playing Go Fish, drinking ginger ale and going to bed before midnight.
Last night, after the children had retired the wife and I were having a discussion about the pros and cons of New Years Eve as a celebratory milestone, eventually agreeing that aside from hanging with the family, we had both endured too many disappointing parties (as a couple, and before we were together) to get revved up about the night. It just seems that outside of an opportunity for binge drinking and an ugly peek into the mass psychology of crowds, the night is better spent amongst those you love.
That said, the tune I bring you today is a look at an early side of the mighty Leon Russell, one of my all time favorites, who I have rhapsodized about in this space before.
Russell came west from Oklahoma in the early 60s, eventually carving himself out a place as an in-demand session player (and member of the Shindogs) in the studios of Los Angeles (including those of Phil Spector) as a keyboardist and arranger.
He teamed up with guitarist/bassist Marc Benno in 1967 to form the band Asylum Choir, and their debut album ‘Look Inside the Asylum Choir’ was released on the Smash label the following year.
The tune I bring you today was the lead-off track from that album. ‘Welcome To Hollywood’ has hints of Russell’s rootsy heart (the guitar and piano could have come off of one of his Shelter LPs), but is marked by psychedelic flourishes. His easily recognizable voice is front and center, but where his later work would be enveloped in waves of Americana, the Asylum Choir tracks feature all manner of timely baroque filigree, including phasing, ringing Beatle-esque trumpets and the like.
‘Welcome To Hollywood’ is a typically jaundiced look at the mean streets that awaited those who were drawn west (but a little further south) during the Summer of Love. It’s a groovy look (listen?) to the world of Leon Russell just prior to his hirsute escalation into rock’s first rank alongside the various and sundry Cocker/Delaney/Bonnie/Clapton conglomerations, and his own amazing solo work.
I hope you dig the tune, and I’ll be back later in the week with something cool.

NOTE: I just updated my post about Steff’s ‘Where Did She Go’ thanks to some info from someone close to the story.

Peace

Larry

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PS Head over to Funky16Corners for some sweet Brazilian jazz!

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